Friday, October 20, 2017

231. Lamar White

231. Lamar White joins us to discuss the fall elections in Louisiana. He also gives us an update on his new project, The Bayou Brief. For more than eleven years, Lamar White, Jr. published CenLamar, one of Louisiana’s most acclaimed and well-known progressive blogs, attracting more than two million readers and repeatedly receiving recognition from national and international news organizations. The Bayou Brief expands the original scope of CenLamar to cover the entire state. For news that's both factual and progressive, follow The Bayou Brief.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. October 22, 1971. 'Coozan' Dudley "Hadacol" LeBlanc died in Abbeville.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. A letter from His Majesty, regarding the transfer of the Ursuline Nuns to Havana, was read at a meeting of the Cabildo on October 21, 1777, and it was agreed to comply with the agreement of August 22, 1777.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Dixie Maze Farms Fall Festival and Corn Maze
    September 23rd, 2017 - October 31st, 2017
    10:00 am - 12:00 am
    DixieMaze Farms
    9596 Sentell Rd.,
    Shreveport, LA 71107
    318-703-2870
    Website
    DixieMaze Farms
    Annual Fall Festival with pumpkin patch, corn maze, hay rides, pony rides, paintball games, arts and crafts and many other attractions.
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Thursday, October 12, 2017

230. Andrei Codrescu

230. We interview poet Andrei Codrescu. He was born in Sibiu, Transylvania, Romania, and emigrated to the United States in 1966. He is the author of numerous books: poems, novels, and essays. He founded Exquisite Corpse: a Journal of Books and Ideas. He was a regular commentator on NPR’s All Things Considered. He taught literature and poetry at Johns Hopkins University, the University of Baltimore, and Louisiana State University.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. October 15, 1802. Spanish king Charles IV ordered retrocession of Louisiana from Spain to France.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Beth Taylor (born October 14, 1954 in New Orleans, became Mississippi's first female television sportscaster when hired by WDAM-TV (an NBC affiliate) in Laurel-Hattiesburg, Mississippi.  Author of the book Bless Them Father, for They Have Sinned, which was published in the summer of 2012. As a child, Taylor experienced something so traumatic that her brain forced her to forget the events for more than 40 years. That event was clergy sexual abuse at the hands of member of the Catholic clergy. Taylor is also a  public relations practitioner and journalist.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Voodoo Fest 2017 will send high-octane music acts, interactive art installations and costumed revelers to City Park from Oct. 27 through Oct. 29.
        Here's your guide to all the nitty-gritty details, from how to score tickets to what to bring to the fest. The upcoming edition should continue to reflect updates made to the event in 2016 after Voodoo Fest was brought under the umbrella of major festival organizer C3 Presents. Among those changes were layout updates to prevent sound bleed and bathroom upgrades festival-wide.
  4. Postcard from Louisiana. Carmen of Popup Jazz Band sings "House of the Rising Sun" on Royal St. in New Orleans.
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Friday, October 6, 2017

229. Richard Campanella

229. We talk to Richard Campanella about his book, Bourbon Street: A History. New Orleans is a city of many storied streets, but only one conjures up as much unbridled passion as it does fervent hatred, simultaneously polarizing the public while drawing millions of visitors a year. A fascinating investigation into the mile-long urban space that is Bourbon Street, Richard Campanella's comprehensive cultural history spans from the street's inception during the colonial period through three tumultuous centuries, arriving at the world-famous entertainment strip of today.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. October 7, 1829. Gov. Derbigny suffers fatal accident when thrown from carriage.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. On October 7, 1816 the Washington, built by Henry M. Shreve, was the first double-decker. steamboat to arrive in New Orleans and became the model for the classic style of Mississippi river boats — flat-bottomed, two stories, steam-powered paddle wheel mounted on the stern, two smoke-stacks. First used to carry cargo it was soon open for passenger transportation. The Washington moved at lightning speed compared to other boats on the rivers — 16 mph upstream and downstream at as much as 25 mph.
         Shreve launched the boat earlier that year on the Monongahela River just above Pittsburgh. Shreve's cleverly designed Washington had all the features that would soon come to characterize the classic Mississippi riverboat: a two-story deck, a stern-mounted paddle wheel powered by a high-pressure steam engine, a shallow, flat-bottomed hull, and a pilothouse framed by two tall chimneys. Perfectly designed for the often-shallow western rivers like the Mississippi and Missouri, the Washington proved itself on its inaugural voyage the following spring. Steaming upriver against the current with full cargo, the Washington reached Louisville in only 25 days, demonstrating that the powerful new generation of steamboats could master the often-treacherous currents of the mighty western rivers. Soon the Washington began to offer regular passenger and cargo service between New Orleans and Louisville.
  3. Postcard from Louisiana. Isis Lovestone reads Bruce's cards in Jackson Square.
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