Thursday, June 22, 2017

214. Tyler Bridges. Long Shot.

214. We interview Tyler Bridges, co-author of Long Shot. This recent book is the story of Louisiana’s 2015 race for governor — but the story of John Bel Edwards’ improbable victory over David Vitter holds lessons for candidates and voters in all 50 states. It’s an inconceivable and sometimes hysterical odyssey that unfolds against the unique backdrop of Louisiana’s back roads, bayous, barrooms, and ballrooms.
     Tyler Bridges and Jeremy Alford, two veteran political reporters in Louisiana, take readers deep into the inner workings of the Edwards and Vitter campaigns. To document this unforgettable ride, they interviewed more than 100 of the people who cut the deals, launched the attacks, and even played both sides. Clancy DuBos, one of the state’s foremost political analysts, brought his tremendous knowledge to bear as he edited the book.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 25, 1868. FL, AL, LA, GA, NC & SC readmitted to US following the Civil War.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Upstairs Lounge Fire. June 24, 1973. Twenty-eight people died at the scene of the sixteen-minute fire, and one died en route to the hospital. Another 18 suffered injuries, of whom three died. The arson was never solved, and it remained the largest hate crime against gay people until the Orlando shooting at the Pulse nightclub on June 12, 2016.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    ComedySportz
    Saturday, July 1
    8:00 PM
    Venue information:
    NOLA Comedy Theater
    5039 Freret St.
    New Orleans, LA 70115
    504.231.7011
    http://www.nolacomedy.com
    Admission: $10 adults, $8 children
    Two teams of comic improvisers compete for points, based upon audience suggestions. Rated "E" for Everyone.
  4. Postcard from Louisiana. Sheryl St. Germain reads her poem, “Getting Rid Of The Accent.”
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Friday, June 16, 2017

213. Arlie Hochschild. Strangers in their own Land.

213. We interview Arlie Hochshild. A sociologist in Berkeley, Arlie spent 5 years with people near Lake Charles to try to understand the attitude of the Tea Party voter. The result of her study, Strangers in Their Own Land is a New York Times best seller and a 2016 finalist for the National Book Award for Nonfiction. Her work goes beyond the commonplace liberal idea that many on the political right have been duped into voting against their interests. In the right-wing world she explores, Hochschild discovers powerful forces—fear of cultural eclipse, economic decline, perceived government betrayal — which override self-interest, as progressives see it, and help explain the emotional appeal of a candidate like Donald Trump. Hochschild draws on her expert knowledge of the sociology of emotion to help us understand what it feels like to live in “red” America.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 20, 1968. Presidential candidate George Wallace speaks in Baton Rouge raising $60,000.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Elias Toutant Beauregard, commandant of Spanish forts. Born, June 17, 1759, New Orleans. In 1779; first served Spain as a member of the New Orleans Company of Carbineers in the Mobile campaign of 1780; was a captain in the Louisiana Infantry Regiment, March 1, 1781; appointed by Gov. Esteban Miró as first commandant at Los Nogales (now Vicksburg, Miss.), April 1791; cooperated with Spanish agents in seeking peace between Choctaw and Creek Indians; reported on all vessels descending the river and served as a courier protector by sending messages up and down the river; was judge of civil and criminal cases; laid the groundwork for the Nogales Conference and signed the Treaty of Nogales, October 28, 1793; replaced as commandant from June 23, 1794; was commandant of the post at San Fernando (now Memphis, Tenn.), May-September 1795; was in New Orleans during yellow-fever epidemic of 1796; returned to Los Nogales as commandant from June 23, 1796 to March 23, 1797; listed in 1798 as a captain, Seventh Company, Second Battalion of the Louisiana Infantry Regiment; lived in New Orleans for a time; removed to Baton Rouge and laid out that part of the city known as Beauregard Town. Thrown from a horse during a military review. Died as a result of the accident, December 3, 1809.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Louisiana Catfish Festival
    June 17th, 2017 - June 19th, 2017
    St. Gertrude Catholic Church
    17324 La. 631
    Des Allemandes, LA 70030
    985-758-7542
    Website
    St. Gertrude Catholic Church
    The festival is held on the grounds of St. Gertrude the Great Catholic Church in Des Allemands. From New Orleans, take I-10 W to I-310. Head south on I-310 for about 12 miles. Exit to the right on Hwy. 90 W to Houma. Continue on Hwy. 90 W through Paradis to Des Allemands. Upon reaching Des Allemands,  St. Gertrude the Great Catholic Church will be on the right side of LA 631 in the Des Allemands Business District.
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Friday, June 9, 2017

212. Wayne Self. "Upstairs."

212. We interview Wayne Self about his musical Upstairs about the UpStairs Lounge Fire. The UpStairs Lounge arson attack took place on June 24, 1973 at a gay bar located in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Thirty-two people died as a result of fire or smoke inhalation. Wayne wrote the musical Upstairs about the fire. Until the Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando one year ago, it was the largest mass killing of gay people in the United States.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 6, 1814. Pierre Lafitte arrested and accused of piracy by order of WCC Clairborne.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) was established by executive order of Franklin Delano Roosevelt on May 6, 1935. It replaced the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) as the federal government agency responsible for combatting the ill effects of the Great Depression. The WPA was a work relief program and it was instrumental in providing jobs for many individuals who had become unemployed during the nation's economic downturn.
          Most WPA projects were carried out by local and state governments using funds provided by Washington. Several projects were administered directly by the federal government, including the Art, Music, Theatre, and Writers' projects. The bulk of WPA spending went toward the construction and maintenance of the nation's infrastructure. Smaller amounts funded educations, recreational, and cultural activities.
          In Louisiana, state headquarters of the WPA was located in New Orleans. The agency also operated district offices around the state. In 1939 the program's name was changed to Work Projects Administration. On December 4, 1942, the president ordered an end to WPA activities as the nation's war effort eliminated most of the unemployment that the agency had been designed to combat.
          WPA projects in the Crescent City ranged from street paving and bridge building to bookbinding and adult education.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Let the Good Times Roll Festival
    June 16th, 2017
    5:00 pm - 12:00 am
    Festival Plaza
    101 Crockett St.,
    Shreveport, LA 71101
    318-470-3890
    Website
    Festival Plaza
        Let The Good Times Roll Festival features performances by top names in soul, gospel, hip-hop and R&B. The festival was named a Southeast Tourism Society Top 20 Event, because of its great line up of music, food and art booths. This will be a weekend-long celebration of African American culture.
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Friday, June 2, 2017

211. Kevin Cutrer. "Lord's Own Anointed."

211. We interview writer Kevin Cutrer about his book of poetry, Lord’s Own Anointed. Kevin is from Kentwood, LA, in the north end of Tangipahoa Parish. He has lived in South America, and now resides in the southernmost neighborhood of Boston. His first poetry collection, Lord’s Own Anointed, was released by Dos Madres Press in 2015. His run-ins with higher education have occurred at Southeastern Louisiana University and Emerson College.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 6, 1814. Pierre Lafitte arrested and accused of piracy by order of WCC Clairborne.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. By ordinance of June 3, 1844 the City Council reorganized the police of the municipality into a Night Watch and a Day Police. The former was composed of a captain, a lieutenant, a sub-lieutenant, two sergeants, and twenty-five men, divided among a main post, a post in Faubourg Washington, and one on the Bayou Road. The captain served at the main post and was responsible for distributing the men, taking care of the weapons, reporting daily to the Recorder (with a copy to the Mayor), and appearing at the Recorder's Court with the prisoners apprehended by the Watch. He was to keep a register of Watch officers and men and a journal of all police activities. All Watch members had to give proof of their citizenship and be able to read and write as well as speak English and French fluently. (NOPL)
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    St Tammany Photographic Society Meeting (User Submitted)
    Monday, June 5
    All Day Event
    Venue information:
    St. Tammany Art Association
    320 N. Columbia St.
    Covington, LA
    http://stphotosociety.org/
    Admission: Yearly dues after the first meeting
    The St Tammany Photographic Society meet the second Thursday of the each month. The club meets at the Covington Art Association, in downtown Covington, LA. Meeting start at 7:00PM, if you are interested in attending a meeting or would like to join the club. Please come to one of our meetings.
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Friday, May 26, 2017

210. Lamar White. Alexandria History

210. We talk to Lamar White, activist and journalist, about the history of his hometown, Alexandria. Lamar runs the CenLemar blog.  He is also in the process of starting The Bayou Brief, which will be the first and only statewide, non-profit, progressive, all-digitial publication, exclusively focusing on Louisiana
  1. This week in Louisiana history. May 29, 1948. The Desire streetcars stopped running.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Vice-President Hubert Humphrey earned a Master of Arts degree in Political Science from LSU in 1940. From 1939 to 1940 he taught there as an assistant instructor of political science. He was born on May 27, 1911 in Wallace, South Dakota.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    STAR Tournament
    May 27th, 2017 - September 2nd, 2017
    State Wide
    P.O. Box 86458,
    Baton Rouge, LA 70879
    225-952-9200
    Website | Email
    State Wide
    The CCA STAR tournament, attracts more than 13,000 anglers and there is over $500,000 in prizes and spans the entire coast of Louisiana. Boundaries are from Texas/Louisiana line to Louisiana/Mississippi line with over 30 weigh stations across the state. It will run from the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend (May 27th) to Labor Day (Sep 4th). For more information you can check out ccastar.com
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Friday, May 19, 2017

209. Ambata Kazi-Nance

209. We interview New Orleans writer Ambata Kazi-Nance. Ambata writes from the perspective of an African-American woman who is also Muslim, living in a city and a culture that don't always know what to make of these characteristics.
       "The mistake often made by well-meaning people is to say that we’re all the same. We are all the same, in the sense that we’re human beings, but we’re all also different. The objective isn’t to erase the differences nor always highlight them, just to acknowledge they exist and not pass judgment based on them. We are as God created us to be. As my four-year-old son lovingly proclaimed one day while we were out walking, 'God made us all from clay, and then He painted us different colors!' Or like a friend who said, observing a newborn baby, 'God never runs out of designs.'”
  1. This week in Louisiana history. May 20, 1835. The Planters Hotel in New Orleans collapsed killing 25.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Jazzland Opens  May 20, 2000. It later became a 6 Flags, and never reopened after Katrina.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Rendez-vous des Cajuns
    January 21st, 2017
    6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
    337-457-7389
    Website
    The Liberty Theatre
    Bring your dancing shoes to "Rendez-vous avec des Cajuns," a live radio show in the Grand Old Opry/Louisiana Hayride/Prairie Home companion format. The emcee hosts the program in Cajun French with enough English spoken so that everyone can enjoy this unique and one-of-a-kind experience. The entire family is welcome so make this event your Saturday night plan. $5 admission charged. Temporarily taking place at Rocky's Cajun Kitchen until renovations are complete!
  4. Postcard from Louisiana.
    We talk to Karen Riley Simmons, Sherry Bovey, and Michelle Riggs from the Sankofa Cultural Collective of Alexandria. The Collective promotes, preserves, and encourages the visual, performance and cultural arts and heritage of people of African descent by providing cultural arts programming for youth and families in Central Louisiana.
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Ambata Kazi-Nance
Karen Riley Simmons, Sherry Bovey, & Michelle Riggs

Friday, May 12, 2017

208. Sam Irwin. Crawfish, part 2

208. Part 2 of our interview with Sam Irwin. Sam is the author of  Louisiana Crawfish: A Succulent History of the Cajun Crustacean. Sam Irwin is a freelance photojournalist living in Baton Rouge. He is a native of Breaux Bridge, the Crawfish Capital of the World, and spent much of his childhood in Henderson, Louisiana at Amy's Fisheries, his grandfather's fish and crawfish market. Sam is the former press secretary of the Louisiana Department of Agriculture & Forestry and a graduate of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He has also been a history teacher, a Cajun music dancehall operator and the owner of a record store.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. May 13, 1864. Alexandia burned to the ground by Union troops.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. May 13, 1921. It took 8  pairs of mules to haul away this 24 ton door for the Hibernia Bank and Trust's new vault door, built by the Mosler Safe Company.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Fidelity’s Concerts in the Park: Swing in the Pines
    Saturday, May 13
    6:00 PM
    Venue information:
    Bogue Falaya Park
    213 Park Drive
    Covington, LA 70433
    504.523.6530
    Guest conductor Ankush Bahl leads the LPO in Fidelity’s annual Concerts in the Park series at beautiful Bogue Falaya Park in Covington! Bring your lawn chairs, refreshments, and the entire family for this annual celebration of popular musical favorites from the past and present.
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Friday, May 5, 2017

207. Sam Irwin. Crawfish, part 1.

207. Part 1 of our interview with Sam Irwin. Sam is the author of  Louisiana Crawfish: A Succulent History of the Cajun Crustacean. Sam Irwin is a freelance photojournalist living in Baton Rouge. He is a native of Breaux Bridge, the Crawfish Capital of the World, and spent much of his childhood in Henderson, Louisiana at Amy's Fisheries, his grandfather's fish and crawfish market. Sam is the former press secretary of the Louisiana Department of Agriculture & Forestry and a graduate of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He has also been a history teacher, a Cajun music dancehall operator and the owner of a record store.

Recipe for Crawfish Bisque.
From Cooking in Old Creole Days.
Take two or three dozen crawfish, throw them in boiling water for a minute or two, clean them thoroughly. Take off the heads, empty them, and clean them and wash them, keeping the fat part of the tails. Put them on a chopping board with the fat, a little chicken or veal, a little stale bread, chop it all fine together, flavor with pepper, red or black, a laurel leaf, or put in a bouquet of aromatic herbs for a few minutes, having tied it with a thread so as to pull it out. Brown all this in a saucepan with a spoonful of lard. Stuff the crawfish heads tight with this. Put them in a saucepan to simmer with a quart of bouillon for an hour or more, until you have a good soup. Serve hot.
Mme. Josephine Nicaud,
Who has been for over forty years in Ambassador Eustis’ family.
  1. This week in Louisiana history.
    • May 7, 1862. The Union Army captures Baton Rouge during the Civil War
    • May 7, 1863. Alexandria captured by Union troops during the Civil War
  2. This week in New Orleans history. On May 6, 1770, the Cabildo attorney requested soliciting  the establishment of a body of horse police.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Bobby Love and Friends Thursday, May 11
    5:00 PM CST
    Venue information:
    Vaso's 500 Frenchmen St. New Orleans, LA 70116
    504.272.0929
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Friday, April 28, 2017

206. Lake Douglas, part 2

206. Part 2 of our interview with Lake Douglas. Lake is an associate professor of landscape architecture and associate dean of research and development at the LSU College of Art & Design. He wrote Gardens of New Orleans: Exquisite Excess with Jeanette Hardy and pictures by Richard Sexton. The book was named the 2001 book of the year by New Orleans-Gulf South Booksellers' Association. In his work Public Spaces, Private Gardens: A History of Designed Landscapes in New Orleans,  Lake employs written accounts, archival data, historic photographs, lithographs, maps, and city planning documents — many of which have never before been published--to explore public and private outdoor spaces in New Orleans and those who shaped them. The result offers the first in-depth examination of the city's landscape history. Douglas presents this "beautiful and imposing" city as a work of art crafted by numerous influences. His survey from the colonial period to the twentieth century finds that geography, climate, and, above all, the multicultural character of its residents have made New Orleans unique in American landscape design history. French and Spanish settlers, Africans and Native Americans, as well as immigrants from Germany, Ireland, Italy, and other parts of the world all participated in creating this community's unique public and private landscapes.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 29, 1820. Gov. Henry Watkins Allen was born in Prince Edward County, Va. The parish "Allen" will later be named for him. He fought in several Civil War battleas and served as Gov in 1864.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Percy Robert Miller (born April 29, 1970 in New Orleans better known by his stage name Master P or his business name P. Miller, is an American rapper, actor, entrepreneur, investor, producer, and former professional minor league Basketball player. He is the founder of the popular label No Limit Records, which went bankrupt and was relaunched as New No Limit Records through Koch Records, followed by Guttar Music Entertainment, and No Limit Forever Records. He is the founder and CEO of P. Miller Enterprises, an entertainment and financial conglomerate and Better Black Television.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Breaux Bridge Crawfish Festival
    May 5th, 2017 - May 7th, 2017
    1290 Rees St.,
    Breaux Bridge, LA 70517
    337-332-6655
    Website | Email
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Friday, April 21, 2017

205. Lake Douglas, part 1

205.  Part 1 of our interview with Lake Douglas.  Lake is associate professor of landscape architecture and associate dean of research and development at the LSU College of Art & Design. He wrote Gardens of New Orleans: Exquisite Excess with Jeanette Hardy and pictures by Richard Sexton. The book was named the 2001 book of the year by New Orleans-Gulf South Booksellers' Association. In his work Public Spaces, Private Gardens: A History of Designed Landscapes in New Orleans,  Lake employs written accounts, archival data, historic photographs, lithographs, maps, and city planning documents — many of which have never before been published--to explore public and private outdoor spaces in New Orleans and those who shaped them. The result offers the first in-depth examination of the city's landscape history. Douglas presents this "beautiful and imposing" city as a work of art crafted by numerous influences. His survey from the colonial period to the twentieth century finds that geography, climate, and, above all, the multicultural character of its residents have made New Orleans unique in American landscape design history. French and Spanish settlers, Africans and Native Americans, as well as immigrants from Germany, Ireland, Italy, and other parts of the world all participated in creating this community's unique public and private landscapes.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 23, 1831. Pontchartrain Railroad opened, first west of Alleghenies.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. From April 22 to 26, 1970, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival was held at Beauregard Square (now Armstrong Park) and the Municipal Auditorium.  Music was performed noon to midnight.  Duke Ellington, Mahalia Jackson, Pete Fountain, Al Hirt, the Preservation Hall Band, and "Hundreds of Others" were scheduled, according to advertising posters.  The festival was produced by George Wein.  Tickets were available at Werlein's, 605 Canal Street.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Senga Nengudi: Improvisional Gestures
    March 16-June 18
    "Senga Nengudi: Improvisational Gestures," sculpture retrospective
    When: Through June 18
        Contemporary Arts Center
            900 Camp St., New Orleans Warehouse District
            phone (504) 528-3800
            www.cacno.org
        In 1975, artist Senga Nengudi began a series of sculptures, entitled R.S.V.P., which evoke the elasticity and durability of the human body.
         Made of everyday materials, such as pantyhose and sand, the works invite viewers to not only respond but to engage with them physically. Stretched and twisted, knotted and looped, the works occupy their space in the gallery much as a figure does—by projecting outward and reaching into the space of the viewer in unexpected ways. Improvisional Gestures includes works from the 1970s to the present, and is the first museum presentation to examine these sculptures together and in such depth.
        Senga Nengudi: Improvisional Gestures is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver and the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs Gallery of Contemporary Art.
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Saturday, April 15, 2017

204. Dylan Waguespack, part 2. Corrected

204. Dylan Waguespack interview, part 2. Dylan is the Outreach and Communications Coordinator at Louisiana Budget Project working on tax reform for a fair, adequate and sustainable state budget. A young professional with a background in state government relations and communications strategy, Dylan has worked to advance state and federal policies which expand opportunity for people impacted by homelessness and hunger.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 16, 1718 Official date of founding of New Orleans.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The Greater New Orleans (GNO) Bridge opened for traffic on April 15, 1958. Construction on the GNO Bridge No. 2 (called the Crescent City Connection) began in March 1981. Traffic first crossed over the second span in September 1988.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Corney Creek Great Outdoors Festival
    April 21st, 2017 - April 22nd, 2017
    5:00 pm - 11:00 pm
    Bernice High School, US 167 SOUTH @ LA. 2 WEST,
    Bernice, LA 71222
    318-368-5300
    The Corney Creek Great Outdoors Festival is the 3rd weekend in April. It last two days. Starts on Friday evening at 5:00 pm and goes to 11:00 pm. On Saturday it starts at 9:00 am goes to 11:00 pm. Food booths, arts and crafts, music, poker run and many other events take place. Good entertainment for the whole family.
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Friday, April 14, 2017

204. Dylan Waguespack, part 2.

204. Dylan Waguespack interview, part 2. Dylan is the Outreach and Communications Coordinator at Louisiana Budget Project working on tax reform for a fair, adequate and sustainable state budget. A young professional with a background in state government relations and communications strategy, Dylan has worked to advance state and federal policies which expand opportunity for people impacted by homelessness and hunger.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 16, 1718 Official date of founding of New Orleans.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The Greater New Orleans (GNO) Bridge opened for traffic on April 15, 1958. Construction on the GNO Bridge No. 2 (called the Crescent City Connection) began in March 1981. Traffic first crossed over the second span in September 1988.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Corney Creek Great Outdoors Festival
    April 21st, 2017 - April 22nd, 2017
    5:00 pm - 11:00 pm
    Bernice High School, US 167 SOUTH @ LA. 2 WEST,
    Bernice, LA 71222
    318-368-5300
    The Corney Creek Great Outdoors Festival is the 3rd weekend in April. It last two days. Starts on Friday evening at 5:00 pm and goes to 11:00 pm. On Saturday it starts at 9:00 am goes to 11:00 pm. Food booths, arts and crafts, music, poker run and many other events take place. Good entertainment for the whole family.
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Friday, April 7, 2017

203. Dylan Waguespack, part 1.

203. Part 1 of our interview with Dylan Waguespack. Dylan is the Outreach and Communications Coordinator at Louisiana Budget Project working on tax reform for a fair, adequate and sustainable state budget. A young professional with a background in state government relations and communications strategy, Dylan has worked to advance state and federal policies which expand opportunity for people impacted by homelessness and hunger.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 8 1812 West Florida made part of Louisiana
  2. This week in New Orleans history.  De La Sallle High School, operated by the Christian Brothers, opened the doors to 76 Catholic freshman boys in 1949 in an old house on Pitt Street in New Orleans
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Natchez Spring Pilgrimage
    Sunday, April 9 & following
    Venue information:
    Stanton Hall 401 High St. Natchez, MS 39120
    (601) 446-6631
    This spring, the city of Natchez, Mississippi will host a celebration of its rich local history with its annual Spring Pilgrimage—a rare opportunity for visitors to get an inside look at some of the most beautifully preserved antebellum mansions in the South. Nationally renowned for its dazzling collection of historic homes, Natchez hosts visitors from across the country each year for Pilgrimage programs, including special presentations, docent-led tours, theatrical performances, live music, and more.
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Friday, March 31, 2017

202. Emily Clark, part 2.

202. Part 2 of our interview with Emily Clark about her research on Ursuline nuns and free women of color. We finish interviewing Emily about her book, Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society, 1727-1834. Emily was the first secular historian allowed into the archives of the Ursuline convent in New Orleans.  She found a treasure trove of information about the early history of the Ursuline nuns and their work in New Orleans. We also talk to her about her book, The Strange History of the American Quadroon: Free Women of Color in the Revolutionary Atlantic World. The free women of color in New Orleans played a distinct role in New Orleans and American culture.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 3, 1793. Pope Pius VI establishes the first Diocese of Louisiana and the Floridas.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Daniel Henry Holmes Establishes D.H. Holmes Department Store April 2, 1842.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Lao New Year Celebration
    April 14th, 2017 - April 16th, 2017
    Lanexang Village
    7913 Champa Ave,
    Broussard, LA 70518
    337-364-3403
    Lanexang Village
    Lanexang Village celebrates the new year every Easter weekend with a three-day festival that includes live music, a beauty pageant, parades, sand castles building, kids activities, and several vendors selling clothes, jewelry, music an food from Southeast Asia.
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Friday, March 24, 2017

201. Emily Clark, part 1

201. Emily Clark, part 1. We interview Emily about her book, Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society, 1727-1834. Emily was the first secular historian allowed into the archives of the Ursuline convent in New Orleans.  She found a treasure trove of information about the early history of the Ursuline nuns and their work in New Orleans. We have the Ursuline Correspondence on our web site now.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 1, 1718. Approx. date land began being cleared for city of New Orleans.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. On March 8, 2011, MSY/New Orleans was one of eight cities given approval for charter flights to Cuba. Flights to Cuba have been scheduled on a very limited basis, with the first departure on March 26, 2012, operated by Sky King, Inc., charters and marketed by Cuba Travel USA. 
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Cajun Classique
    April 3rd, 2017 - April 9th, 2017
    Bayou Teche
    Berwick to Breaux Bridge,
    New Iberia, LA 70560
    337-366-0337
    Website
    Bayou Teche
    Leisurely classic wooden boat cruise down Bayou Teche with excursions in Franklin, New Iberia, St. Martinville and Breaux Bridge.
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Friday, March 17, 2017

200. Kim Vaz Deville. The Baby Dolls

200. We interview Kim Vaz Deville, author of The "Baby Dolls": Breaking the Race and Gender Barriers of the New Orleans Mardi Gras Tradition. One of the first women’s organizations to mask and perform during Mardi Gras, the Million Dollar Baby Dolls redefined the New Orleans carnival tradition. Tracing their origins from Storyville-era brothels and dance halls to their re-emergence in post-Katrina New Orleans, author Kim Marie Vaz uncovers the fascinating history of the “raddy-walking, shake-dancing, cigar-smoking, money-flinging” ladies who strutted their way into a predominantly male establishment.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. March 20, 1839. Shreveport become a "city" on the northern end of the Red River.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Clarence "Frogman" Henry, was born March 19, 1937 in Algiers. His trademark croak, utilized to the maximum on his 1956 debut hit "Ain't Got No Home," earned Henry his nickname and jump-started a career that endures to this day. "(I Don't Know Why) But I Do" and "You Always Hurt the One You Love", both from 1961, were also top-selling records.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Dave Robicheaux's Hometown Literary Festival
    March 31st, 2017 - April 2nd, 2017
    New Iberia-information at Shadows-on-the-Teche
    317 E. Main St,
    New Iberia, LA 70560
    337-369-6446
    Website
    New Iberia.  Information at Shadows-on-the-Teche
    Literary festival honoring Iberia authors as well as others from around the world. Focused on James Lee Burke's legendary literary character, Dave Robicheaux, and his hometown. There will be events throughout the festival at various venues celebrating literature and its impact on our culture as a parish. Events include storytelling, workshops, academic symposium, theatrical vignettes, music, local cuisine, Dave Robicheaux tours and a 5K run.
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Friday, March 10, 2017

199. Adam Rothman

199. We interview Adam Rothman about his book, Beyond Freedom's Reach. Born into slavery in rural Louisiana, Rose Herera was bought and sold several times before being purchased by the De Hart family of New Orleans. Still a slave, she married and had children, who also became the property of the De Harts. But after Union forces captured New Orleans in 1862 during the American Civil War, Herera’s owners fled to Havana, taking three of her small children with them. Beyond Freedom’s Reach is the true story of one woman’s quest to rescue her children from bondage.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. March 14, 1780 Galvez captures Ft. Charlotte at Mobile.
  2. This week in New Orleans history.  Wardell Quezergue (March 12, 1930 – September 6, 2011) was an American music arranger, producer and bandleader, known among New Orleans musicians as the “Creole Beethoven.”
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    New Orleans Spring Fiesta Association
    November 25th, 2016
    New Orleans Spring Fiesta Association
    826 St. Ann Street,
    New Orleans, LA 70116
    504-581-1367
    March 25-26 and April 1-2, 2017
    Website
    New Orleans Spring Fiesta Association
    Spring Festival is a series of events designed to entertain, educate, and allow all to revel in the cultural heritage that is uniquely New Orleans. Tours of private French Quarter homes and courtyards and a presentation of the Spring Fiesta Queen and her court in antebellum attire.
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Friday, March 3, 2017

198. Michael McHale

198. We interview Michael McHale, 1st Vice Chair, Louisiana Democratic Party.We talk about Democratic prospects in Louisiana, and about how average citizens can become involved. He has been active in Democratic politics all of his life. He has been on the Democratic State Central Committee since 1996. And has served as 1st Vice Chair since 2008. Before that Michael served as President of the Young Democrats of Louisiana and Executive Vice President of the Young Democrats of America. He served as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1992, 1996 and 2008. He is a practicing attorney in Lake Charles and has been for 15 years. He is a graduate of Southern University Law Center and Northwestern State University.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. March 6, 1867. General Philip Sheridan arrives in New Orleans to command the Fifth Military District (Louisiana and Texas) during Reconstruction.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. On March 5, 1837, The Picayune described "dead rats, dogs horses, etc, etc, etc, with which our city abounds."
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Shadows Plein Air
    March 11th, 2017 - March 18th, 2017
    9:00 am - 4:00 pm
    Shadows-on-the-Teche
    317 E Main St,
    New Iberia, LA 70560
    337-369-6446
    Website
    Shadows-on-the-Teche
    Plein air painters will be outdoors in the Shadows-on-the-Teche gardens, along Main Street, on Avery Island and possibly other areas for visitors to view. Art will be on exhibit at the Shadows Visitor Center in mid April. Additional details are available on the Shadows website.
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Friday, February 24, 2017

197. Lolis Elie, Part 2.

197. Part 2 of our interview with Lolis Eric Elie. Lolis is a New-Orleans born, Los-Angeles based writer and filmmaker. He wrote for the HBO series Treme. Working with the award-winning director Dawn Logsdon, he co- produced and wrote the PBS documentary, Faubourg Treme: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans. His essay, “America’s Greatest Hits,” is included in Best African American Essays: 2009. He is the author of Smokestack Lightning: Adventures in the Heart of Barbecue Country and co-producer and writer of Smokestack Lightning: A Day in the Life of Barbecue, the documentary based on that book. He is editor of Cornbread Nation 2: The Best of Southern Food Writing.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. February 27, 1827. New Orleans kicks off its first Mardi Gras. A group of students, inspired by a study abroad experience in Paris, took to the streets in masks and costumes to celebrate and party. The celebrations became more elaborate every year. In 1833, it was made an official city wide celebration.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Happy Birthday, Fats Domino. Born in the Ninth Ward on February 26, 1928
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    New Iberia Azalea Trail
    March 1st, 2017 - April 30th, 2017
    Iberia Parish
    Main St,
    New Iberia, LA 70560
    337-365-1540 | 888-942-3742 | Fax
    Website
    Iberia Parish
    Delicate Azaleas bloom early each Spring flooding the landscape with a sea of red, pink, white, purple and salmon.  Our easy self guided driving tour offers a glimpse of all the beautiful flowers along the trail from the miniature varieties to the massive.
  4. Postcard from Louisiana.  This week we talk to Elisabeth Grant-Gibson at a recent demonstration in Monroe urging Senator Cassidy to hold a town hall meeting in North Louisiana.
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Friday, February 17, 2017

196. Lolis Eric Elie, Part 1

196. Part 1 of our interview with Lolis Eric Elie. Lolis is a New-Orleans born, Los-Angeles based writer and filmmaker. He wrote for the HBO series Treme. Working with the award-winning director Dawn Logsdon, he co- produced and wrote the PBS documentary, Faubourg Treme: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans. His essay, “America’s Greatest Hits,” is included in Best African American Essays: 2009. He is the author of Smokestack Lightning: Adventures in the Heart of Barbecue Country and co-producer and writer of Smokestack Lightning: A Day in the Life of Barbecue, the documentary based on that book. He is editor of Cornbread Nation 2: The Best of Southern Food Writing.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. February 21, 1882. First Mardi Gras Parade in Lake Charles takes place.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Doctor Edgar Hull, Jr. (February 20, 1904 – October 24, 1984), was a founding faculty member of the Louisiana State University Medical Center in New Orleans in 1931. He was among those called upon to treat Huey P. Long after he was shot in 1935.  In 1983, after nearly a half-century, Hull published his memoirs, This I Remember: An Informal History of the Louisiana State University Medical Center in New Orleans. Unlike LSU historian T. Harry Williams, who suggested Long might have survived with better medical care, Hull said that Long could not have survived the shooting. He denied that Long had died from medical or surgical incompetence.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Krewe of Dionysus Mardi Gras Parade
    February 25th, 2017
    Downtown
    781 Front Street,
    Natchitoches, LA 71457
    800-259-1714
    Website
    Downtown
    Family friendly night time parade, super floats, lots of throws, marching bands.  Parade begins in East Natchitoches and travels to the Landmark Historic District.  Pre-party in the downtown historic district.
  4. Postcard from the Louisiana Resistance: Joy Robinson.
    We catch up with Joy at the Monroe Civic Center, were a group was demonstrating at an event attended by Senator Bill Cassidy.
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Friday, February 10, 2017

195. JB Borders IV, part 2

195. Part 2 of our interview with J. B. Borders IV.  Borders has written the book, Marking Time, Making Place: An Essential Chronology of Blacks in New Orleans Since 1718. Considered the birthplace of jazz and gumbo, and habitat of the fascinating blend of black and European blood called creole, New Orleans is the site of historical and cultural contributions that include music, cuisine, architecture, and politics. J. B.'s timeline starts in 1718 and notes the major names, events, and locations involving African Americans in New Orleans for the last 300 years.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. February 14, 1957 Southern Christian Leadership Conference founded in New Orleans. 
  2. This week in New Orleans history. New Orleans soul singer and songwriter King Floyd was born in New Orleans on February 13, 1945.  He was best known for his top 10 hit from 1970, "Groove Me".  Floyd  passed away on March 6, 2006.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Cajun Country Courir de Mardi Gras
    February 23rd, 2017 - February 28th, 2017
    Various Locations in Eunice, LA
    Downtown Eunice, 300 S. Second St.,
    Eunice, LA 70535
    337-457-7389
    Website
    This unique five day celebration is not your typical idea of Mardi Gras with beads and doubloons. In fact you won't find these trinkets in sight, but instead, men and women on horseback donned in hand crafted wire masks, tall hats called capuchons, and very distinctive costumes. This one of a kind celebration begins the Friday before Mardi Gras Day, but the main event is the Courir de Mardi Gras procession or "chicken run" which involves chasing a live chicken to collect for a community gumbo, and silliness by revelers all day. Don't wait till Fat Tuesday to join in the fun. Throughout the weeked, experience the town's rural traditions with jam sessions, street dances, cooking demos, Mardi Gras exhibits and a special Liberty Theater show. Les Jeunes and L'il Mardi Gras runs for children are on Sunday as well as an old time boucherie (hog butchering).
         The Eunice Courir de Mardi Gras dates back from when the town was first established in the late 19th century. The Courir was abandoned for a few years during World War II, but in 1946 a small band of riders revived the tradition. Today, the Eunice Courir de Mardi Gras has more than 2,000 participants on the run, and it continues to increase each year.
  4. Postcard from the Louisiana Resistance: Chris Wade.
    We interview Chris Wade of COEXIST about the Unity March at ULM on February 4, 2017. The march was in support of international students after Donald Trump's travel ban.
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Friday, February 3, 2017

194. J.B. Borders IV, part 1

194. Part 1 of our interview with J. B. Borders IV.  Borders has written the book, Marking Time, Making Place: An Essential Chronology of Blacks in New Orleans Since 1718. Considered the birthplace of jazz and gumbo, and habitat of the fascinating blend of black and European blood called creole, New Orleans is the site of historical and cultural contributions that include music, cuisine, architecture, and politics. J. B.'s timeline starts in 1718 and notes the major names, events, and locations involving African Americans in New Orleans for the last 300 years.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. February 7, 2010. New Orleans Saints win their very first Super Bowl and finish the year at 14-3.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Born in New Orleans on February 6, 1944, Wilson Turbinton (known as Tee and Willie Tee) arranged, co-wrote and led the band on the Wild Magnolias' self-titled 1974 debut album. The popularity of that recording, and the subsequent They Call Us Wild introduced the Mardi Gras Indians' street-beat funk to the world.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Fasching Karneval & Parade
    February 11th, 2017
    10:00 am - 9:00 pm
    Downtown Minden
    520 Broadway,
    Minden, LA 71055
    318-377-2144
    Website
    Downtown Minden
    Celebrating our German Heritage! "Fasching" is the German version of Mardi Gras. Activities 10am until dark. Food, Fun and Vendors. For more information call  Becky White at (318) 371-4258.
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Friday, January 27, 2017

193. Sean Patrick Donlan

193. We interview Sean Patrick Donlan. Sean was born in Hammond and educated in Louisiana and Ireland and taught in Ireland, as well as in Canada, France, Italy, and Malta. He is currently an Associate Professor of Law and the Deputy Head of the Law School at the University of the South Pacific in Port Fila, Efate, Vanuatu. He has a blog entitled The View from Below. He’s also managed several legal blogs and created and edits Comparative Legal History and the Juris Diversitas Book Series.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. January 31, 1966. Centenary College admits first black students in its 140 year history.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Actor and comedian Garrett Morris was born in New Orleans on February 1, 1937.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Cajun Groundhog Day
    February 2nd, 2017
    7:00 am - 8:00 am
    Bouligny Plaza
    102 W Main St,
    New Iberia, LA 70560
    337-365-6773 | Fax
    Website
    Bouligny Plaza
    Annual event where New Iberia's own version of the traditional groundhog, Pierre C. Shaddeaux, a native nutria, emerges to predict weather the weather for the next six weeks…either a long or short spring depending on if Pierre sees his shaddeaux or not.
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