Friday, December 25, 2015

136. Sim Shattuck, part 2.

136. Part 2 of our interview with Sim Shattuck.  Sim was born in Decatur, Georgia, has lived in Baton Rouge, Dallas, and New York City, although most of his growing years were in Northern Virginia, where he graduated from George Mason University in 1972. He earned his Ph.D. in English from the University of Southern Mississippi in 1997. He retired from teaching English at Louisiana Tech University and is currently living in Covington, Louisiana. He has also written the following novels: Yarilo's Dance, Krewe of Hecate, Basilisk, & Pleasant Hurricanes.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. December 25 1913 "Candy" Candido was born today in New Orleans. You can hear his voice in Disney's "Peter Pan," "Robin Hood," and the Haunted Mansion attraction, among other Disney productions.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. George Joseph Porter, Jr. (born December 26, 1947) is best known as the bassist and singer for The Meters. Along with Art Neville, Porter formed the group in the mid 1960s and came to be recognized as one of the progenitors of funk.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    New Year's Eve in New Orleans
    Jackson Square
    For the biggest party in the city, head down to Jackson Square – the Quarter is packed with festive partygoers eager to count down the time until the New Year arrives. And because New Orleans does everything a little differently, don’t expect your run of the mill New Years ball drop; instead “Baby New Year” drops from its perch on the top of Jax Brewery followed by a magnificent fireworks show over the Mississippi. Follow the crowds to Bourbon Street and party til’ the early morning, or break away from the group and find your own special spot to celebrate in.
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Friday, December 18, 2015

135. Sim Shattuck, Part 1

135. Part 1 of our interview with Sim Shattuck.  Sim was born in Decatur, Georgia, has lived in Baton Rouge, Dallas, and New York City, although most of his growing years were in Northern Virginia, where he graduated from George Mason University in 1972. He earned his Ph.D. in English from the University of Southern Mississippi in 1997. He retired from teaching English at Louisiana Tech University and is currently living in Covington, Louisiana. He has also written the following novels: Yarilo's Dance, Krewe of Hecate, Basilisk, & Pleasant Hurricanes.
  1. David Middleton reads "The Shepherd: A Christmas Play." 1951.  Saline, Louisiana.
  2. This week in Louisiana history. December 20, 1941. The Flying Tigers had their first combat baptism when the Americans shot down three of four unescorted Japanese bombers.
  3. This week in New Orleans history. Streecars running from Canal Street to Lee Circle via Carondelet Street and St. Charles Street in the Central Business District began running again, after Hurricane Katrina, on December 19, 2006 at 10:30am Central time.
  4. This week in Louisiana. 
    Natchitoches Festival of Lights
    November 21, 2015 - January 6, 2016
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Saturday, December 12, 2015

134. Louisiana Calling. Update

134. Oops.  We somehow posted an episode of Louisiana Calling that was NOT the right interview.  Also, Bruce was recovering from a cold, which is why his voice sounds different.  So here we go again to try to get it right: 

Today we're cross-posting an episode of Louisiana Calling with Bruce France & Eliot Barron.  Today the microphone is reversed as Bruce (Magee) is interviewed by Bruce France & Eliot Barron for their podcast, Louisiana Calling.  If you're a fan of the Louisiana Anthology Podcast, you'll probably like Louisiana Calling as well.
  1. Erin Lierl, the Sidewalk Poet, is under the weather this week, so we are re-broadcasting one of her poems from a few months ago.
  2. This week in Louisiana history. December 15, 1802. Pres. Jefferson, worried of French takeover of La., seeks to purchase Isle of Orleans.
  3. This week in New Orleans history.  December 12, 1970.  The Doors last live performance ever at A Warehouse.  New Orleanians were excited to scoop up $5.00 general admission tickets to the Beaver Production 8 P.M show at A Warehouse, at 1820 Tchoupitoulas on December 12, 1970, which were available at popular venues such as Far Out, Sound City, and Fat Head.  The enthusiastic audience unwittingly witnessed the final live performance of the The Doors that night. On July 31, 1971 James Douglas "Jim" Morrison was found dead in a Paris apartment bathtub by his long-time companion Pamela Courson. He was 27 years old.
  4. This week in Louisiana.
    Deridder Gem and Mineral Show
    December 13 - 14, 2014
    Beauregard Parish Fairgrounds
    Deridder, LA 70634
    Largest Gem and Mineral show in the area 18 vendors , featuring some of the best hidden treasures in Louisiana including fossil, minerals, gemstones, jewelry, Indian artifacts and much more! Admission: $2.00 Adults, children under 12 is free, Military person free on Sunday.


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Friday, December 11, 2015

134. Louisiana Calling

134. Today we're cross-posting an episode of Louisiana Calling with Bruce France & Eliot Barron.  Today the microphone is reversed as Bruce (Magee) is interviewed by Bruce France & Eliot Barron for their podcast, Louisiana Calling.  If you're a fan of the Louisiana Anthology Podcast, you'll probably like Louisiana Calling as well.
  1. Erin Lierl, the Sidewalk Poet, is under the weather this week, so we are re-broadcasting one of her poems from a few months ago.
  2. This week in Louisiana history. December 15, 1802. Pres. Jefferson, worried of French takeover of La., seeks to purchase Isle of Orleans.
  3. This week in New Orleans history.  December 12, 1970.  The Doors last live performance ever at A Warehouse.  New Orleanians were excited to scoop up $5.00 general admission tickets to the Beaver Production 8 P.M show at A Warehouse, at 1820 Tchoupitoulas on December 12, 1970, which were available at popular venues such as Far Out, Sound City, and Fat Head.  The enthusiastic audience unwittingly witnessed the final live performance of the The Doors that night. On July 31, 1971 James Douglas "Jim" Morrison was found dead in a Paris apartment bathtub by his long-time companion Pamela Courson. He was 27 years old.
  4. This week in Louisiana.
    Deridder Gem and Mineral Show
    December 13 - 14, 2014
    Beauregard Parish Fairgrounds
    Deridder, LA 70634
    Largest Gem and Mineral show in the area 18 vendors , featuring some of the best hidden treasures in Louisiana including fossil, minerals, gemstones, jewelry, Indian artifacts and much more! Admission: $2.00 Adults, children under 12 is free, Military person free on Sunday.


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Friday, December 4, 2015

133. Erin Lierl, Part 2.

133.  Part 2 of Bruce's interview with Erin Lierl.  If you are walking through the French Quarter and find yourself on Royal St. between St. Peter St. and Pirate Alley, you may see Erin Lierl, the sidewalk poet. Erin Bruce met Erin this summer and interviewed her for the podcast. Erin writes poems by commission -- you can ask her to write on a topic, and she will write a poem in return for a voluntary donation.  For the past several weeks, Erin has been joining us on the podcast to share her poetry with our wider audience.  Today, Erin discusses her poem "Prowl," and Bruce discusses his haiku, "Place d'Armes."
  1. We check in with Erin Lierl, the Sidewalk Poet, and she reads us her poem of the week, "Crown of Thorns." 
  2. This week in Louisiana history. December 5, 1960. The Federal Court stops attempt by State Legislature to replace the New Orleans School Board during the desegregation crisis.
  3. This week in New Orleans history.   Born in New Orleans on December 5, 1925, Alvin "Red" Tyler began playing saxophone when in the Navy, and by 1950 had joined Dave Bartholomew’s R&B band. He also played jazz in club jam sessions. He made his recording debut on Fats Domino’s “The Fat Man” and went on to play on sessions for Little Richard, Lloyd Price, Aaron Neville, Lee Dorsey, Dr. John, and numerous other rhythm and blues artists.  From the mid-1960s he worked as a liquor salesman. He also began leading his own jazz band in clubs and hotel residencies in New Orleans. While the baritone saxophone had been his primary instrument during his years as a studio musician, his jazz playing gradually came to rely much more on tenor saxophone. In the mid-1980s he recorded two jazz albums, Graciously and Heritage, with vocals by Johnny Adams and Germaine Bazzle, for Rounder Records.  Tyler died on April 3, 1998 at age 72 in New Orleans.
  4. This week in Louisiana.
    Deridder Gem and Mineral Show
    December 13 - 14, 2014
    Beauregard Parish Fairgrounds - Deridder, LA
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Friday, November 27, 2015

132. Lamar White wraps up the governor's race.

 132. Lamar White joins us to wrap up the Louisiana governor's race. Regular listeners know that Lamar has been our friend for a long time, and he joins us as an activist and a journalist who supports progressive causes in Louisiana.  Best known for his CenLamar blog, Lamar has recently completed his law degree in Texas and returned to Louisiana to pursue his PhD in journalism at LSUToday we discuss the election of John Bel Edwards as the next governor of Louisiana, along with other current political issues in Louisiana.
  1. Erin Lierl, the Sidewalk Poet, joins us to tell us about Black Friday in New Orleans and to read us a poem about when the money arrives.
  2. This week in Louisiana history. November 30, 1803. As Colonial Prefect - Pierre Laussat formally receives possession of Louisiana for France.
  3. This week in New Orleans history. Tulane vs. LSU. November 28, 1931.  The "Battle for the Rag" was a rivalry game played by the LSU Tigers and the Tulane Green Wave, played nearly every year since its inception in 1893, with the last of ninety-eight games being played in 2009. The winning team was awarded a satin trophy flag known as the Tiger Rag at LSU and the Victory Flag at Tulane.  The cover from the Saturday, November 28, 1931 program shows that the game was played at Tulane Stadium that year.  Tulane defeated the Tigers 34-7.  By doing so, Tulane became the only major undefeated, untied team to win the Southern Conference championship.  Under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Green Wave went on the play in the 1932 Rose Bowl, losing to the USC (University of Southern California) Trojans 21-12.
  4. This week in Louisiana.
    Christmas New Orleans Style
    December 1 - 31, 2014
    Various locations - New Orleans, LA 70130
    Month‑long holiday celebration featuring over 100 events, held throughout New Orleans, including free concerts at the historic St. Louis Cathedral, cooking demonstrations, historic home tours, Celebration in the Oaks, a riverfront bonfire festival and cruises aboard the Steamboat Natchez. Also, Enjoy an authentic taste of New Orleans at the city's finest restaurants with Reveillon Dinners. Special hotel rates are also offered.
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Friday, November 20, 2015

131. Erin Lierl and Angela the Spritual Counselor

131.  Part one of Bruce's interview with Erin Lierl, the sidewalk poet.  If you are walking through the French Quarter and find yourself on Royal St. between St. Peter St. and Pirate Alley, you may see Erin Lierl. Bruce met Erin this summer and interviewed her for the podcast. Erin writes poems by commission — you can ask her to write on a topic, and she will write a poem in return for a voluntary donation.  For the past several weeks, Erin has been joining us on the podcast to share her poetry with our wider audience.  Bruce also interviews Angela, the spiritual counselor, while she reads his cards in Jackson Square.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. November 21, 1648. Rene Robert Cavelier LaSalle born in Rouen France.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Dedication of the Kenner Library. November 21, 1966.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Mistletoe and More Show
    November 28 - December 30, 2014
    Bossier Civic Center
    Bossier City, LA 71111
    Our show features an array of home furnishings, seasonal decor, personalized items, bath and body, tasty treats, women's and children accessories, handmade and fashion jewelry, and so much more. Our show is affordable for everyone. Join us for a day of shopping with the finest exhibitors from three states.
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Bruce and Erin Lierl
Angela the Spiritual Counselor

Friday, November 13, 2015

130. A Scribe Called Quess?

130. We interview poet a Scribe Called Quess?  Michael “Quess?” Moore is a poet, educator, and an actor in that order. His writing and work with youth as a poet led him to the classroom where he most recently spent four years as an English teacher. He is a founding member of Team SNO (Slam New Orleans), New Orleans’ first slam poetry team since Hurricane Katrina, and the only national championship team the city has ever produced having won competitions in 2010, 2012 and 2013. His accomplishments with Team SNO have earned him honors from the Mayor of New Orleans as well as from City Council. He’s also a member of VOIC’D (Voices Organized in Creative Dissent), a collective of actors spawned by Junebug Productions with a focus on social justice, whose last production, “Lockdown,” received critical acclaim and sold out audiences several nights in a row. He has produced a self-titled CD, “A Scribe Called Quess?” and his debut book of poetry, Blind Visionz, can be found at www.lulu.com.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. November 15, 1730. Gov. Perier and French defeated the Natchez Indians.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. On November 14, 2008, the new slot-machine facility opened for operation at the Fair Grounds.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    A Christmas Extravaganza
    November 22 - 23, 2014
    Kees Park - Pineville, LA
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Friday, November 6, 2015

129. Roy Guste.

129.  We interview Roy Guste. In many ways, Roy is New Orleans history. Descendent of the earliest Louisianians who came here to settle the land with Iberville and Bienville, he is also a fifth generation member of the Antoine's Restaurant family, great-great grandson of its founder Antoine Alciatore, and former director of that restaurant. He has written numerous books about food and Antoine's Restaurant.  Roy's most recent book deals with the history and lore of America's oldest family-owned restaurant: Antoine's Restaurant Since 1840, 175th Anniversary Celebration. Roy is currently a photographer of the New Orleans life and architecture. A native New Orleanian and 36-year resident of the French Quarter, Roy Guste is a true son of the city. Roy studied architecture at both LSU and Tulane Universities, Psychology and French language at Loyola University, French language and culture at L'Universite de Grenoble in the French Alps, as well as cuisine at the Cordon Bleu in Paris. Roy is author of 10 cookbooks, principally New Orleans and Louisiana cuisine, including Antoine's Restaurant Cookbook, The Restaurants of New Orleans Cookbook, The Bean Book, Gulf-Coast Fish, The Tomato Cookbook, and The 100 Greatest Dishes of New Orleans Creole Cooking. He has acted as editor for other restaurant cookbooks and written The Secret Gardens of the Vieux Carre, Little, Brown, Publishers, which is a photographic guide to the most beautiful courtyard gardens in the French Quarter. His upcoming work is entitled The New Orleans Cookbook, to be published by WW Norton, New York & London, which is the entirety of history and the recipes of all that is Creole New Orleans cuisine.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. November 7, 1848. Louisianian Gen Zachary Taylor elected as President of the United States.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Born in New Orleans on November 7, 1912 and a lifelong resident, Lloyd Alfred "Hap" Glaudi attended Jesuit where he first picked up the nickname "Hap" because of his jovial demeanor. Local broadcaster Ron Brocato reported that Glaudi financed his high school education through winnings at the Fair Grounds -- long-shot bets suggested to him by a bookie. A graudate of  Loyola, Glaudi's first professional job was for the New Orleans Item newspaper. During his 25 years with the Item, he became feature sportswriter for high school sports. Beginning in 1964, he was lead sportscaster for WWL-TV.  He publicly prodded predominately white Jesuit High School and then predominately African-American St. Augustine High School to play each other in high school basketball in 1965, which is credited by some to have ended the local racial divide in high school sports. A Hap Glaudi Scholarship is now offered by his alma mater. Hap and his wife Millie had three daughters.  He passed away on December 29, 1989 at the age of 77.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    89th Annual Festival of Lights
    November 21, 2015 - January 6, 2016
    Front Street
    Natchitoches, LA
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Friday, October 30, 2015

128. John Bel Edwards and Lamar White.

 128.  We interview blogger Lamar White about Louisiana's fall election.  Lamar recently completed his law degree in Texas and has returned to Louisiana to pursue a Ph.D. in journalism at LSU.  On top of all his studies, Lamar finds time to keep up his reporting on Louisiana politics; his scoops frequently make state-wide and nation-wide news. Lamar is joined by his friend Cayman Clevenger.  Also, after John Bel Edward's victory in the primary, we are re-broadcasting our interview with him from last spring.
  1. Erin Lierl, the Sidewalk Poet, reads her poem, “I Lived inside an Eggshell.”
  1.  This week in Louisiana history. October 29, 1768. Ulloa was order out of the Louisiana Colony by the Superior Council.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Josephine Louise Newcomb, born in Baltimore on October 31, 1816 to Mary Sophia Waters and Alexander Le Monnier, received her education in Baltimore and in her father's native France.  After her mother died, Le Monnier went to live in New Orleans, where her older sister Eleanor Anne and brother-in-law William Henderson had settled.  There, Le Monnier met Warren Newcomb, and the couple married in Christ Church Cathedral on December 15, 1845.  The couple moved to Louisville, KY, and had a son, Warren, Jr., who died shortly after his birth in 1853. They later moved to New York, where Josephine gave birth to their second child, Harriott Sophie Newcomb, on July 29, 1855.  Harriott Sophie died in 1870 at the age of 15.  Through Josephine's philanthropy, H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College at Tulane University was established as a memorial to her daughter. 
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Southdown Fall Marketplace
    November 7, 2015
    Southdown Plantation House
    991 Grand Caillou Rd.
    Houma, LA 70363
    (985) 876-6380
     $5.00 entrance fee per person, children under 12 free. Additional charges for food, drinks, and museum tours. Most extensive show in the Houma area and an established community event for more than 30 years. Family‑friendly atmosphere. Food court run by museum volunteers.
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Friday, October 16, 2015

126. Terry L Jones, Part 1

126.  Part one of our interview with Terry L. Jones.  We discuss Louisiana history and characters like Leonidas K. Polk. Terry is a native of Winn Parish, has served ULM for over 22 years as a professor. He earned a Ph.D. in history from Texas A&M University and a B.A. from Louisiana Tech University. 
  1. Erin Lierl, the Sidewalk Poet, gives us an update on Irish Fest in New Orleans and reads her poem "Hurricane" about life in the Caribbean after the storm of colonialism.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. October 18, 1730. Gov. Cadillac dies in France at the age of 74.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Lee Harvey Oswald is Born in New Orleans October 18, 1939.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Ponchatoula Party in the Pits
    October 17, 2015
    11:00 am - 5:00 pm
    Ponchatoula Memorial Park
    Ponchatoula, LA 70454   
    Annual Party in the Pits sponsored by the Ponchatoula Chamber of Commerce. We're closing down the streets & opening up the town for BBQ! Cooking begins early. All other events open 11 am till 6 pm. Over 50 teams, including professional & local, will compete for $5000 in cash & prizes. Winner will go to the IBCA Championship in Las Vegas. Cook Entry Fee $150‑$175. No charge for community!
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Friday, October 9, 2015

125. Mike Sledge, Part 2.

125.  Part two of our interview with Mike Sledge. Mike lives and writes in Shreveport, Louisiana. He wrote the book Soldier Dead about what happens to the bodies of America's military personnel when they die in combat. He has also written a novel entitled Gerald's Star, which covers a long-dead astronaut in a decaying orbit around Earth.
  1. Erin Lierl joins us from New Orleans for her segment, The Sidewalk Poet. This week, she reads her poem, "Your True Self."
  2.  This week in Louisiana history. October 10, 1974. Cindy K. Bell became first woman LA. State Trooper.
  3. This week in New Orleans history. Jazz drummer Edward Joseph Blackwell, born in New Orleans on October 10, 1929, played in a bebop quintet during the 1950s with pianist Ellis Marsalis and clarinetist Alvin Batiste. They toured briefly with Ray Charles. Blackwell achieved national attention as the drummer with Ornette Coleman's quartet around 1960, when he took over for Billy Higgins in the quartet's legendary stand at the Five Spot in New York City. He is known as one of the great innovators of the free jazz of the 1960s, fusing New Orleans second line style and African rhythms with bebop. In the 1970s and 1980s Blackwell toured and recorded extensively with fellow Ornette Quartet veterans Don Cherry, Charlie Haden, and Dewey Redman in the quartet Old and New Dream. He died on  October 7, 1992.
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Friday, October 2, 2015

124. Mike Sledge, Part 1

124.  Part one of our interview with Mike Sledge. Mike lives and writes in Shreveport, Louisiana. He wrote the book Soldier Dead about what happens to the bodies of America's military personnel when they die in combat. He has also written a novel entitled Gerald's Star, which covers a long-dead astronaut in a decaying orbit around Earth.
  1. Sidewalk Poet Erin Lierl joins us from Kentucky for her segment, The Sidewalk Poet. This week, she reads her poem, "Our Season's Penance."
  2. This week in Louisiana history. October 1, 1800. Spain returns the Louisiana Territory to France October 1, having received it by the   Treaty of Paris in 1763. A secret agreement in the Treaty of San Ildefonso signed in 1796 has obliged her to return it; France guarantees not to transfer the territory to any power other than Spain.
  3. This week in New Orleans history. Photographer Ernest J. Bellocq died in New Orleans on October 3, 1949 and is interred St. Louis Cemetery III on Esplanade Avenue near City Park.  Born in New Orleans in 1883, he operated studios in the city from 1909 until 1932, including locations at 840 Conti Street, 157 Baronne Street, 608 Canal Street, and 818 Ursulines Street. Bellocq achieved posthumous fame with the publication of Storyville Portraits, a selection of portraits which he made of prostitutes in the red-light district of New Orleans. The movie Pretty Baby (1978) is based loosely on that part of his life.
  4. This week in Louisiana.
    60th Celebration of the Louisiana Art & Folk Festival
    October 10, 2015
    Downtown - Columbia, LA 71418   
    This is the longest running festival in the state of Louisiana. come and join in on the fun for the Louisiana Art and Folk Festival.
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Friday, September 25, 2015

123. Interview with activist Mike Tidwell

123.  Our interview with Mike Tidwell. Mike is founder and director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, a grassroots nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness about the impacts and solutions associated with global warming in Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.. He is also an author and filmmaker who predicted in vivid detail the Katrina hurricane disaster in his 2003 book Bayou Farewell: The Rich Life and Tragic Death of Louisiana’s Cajun Coast. His most recent book, focusing on Katrina and global warming, is titled The Ravaging Tide: Strange Weather, Future Katrinas, and the Race to Save America’s Coastal Cities.
  1. Sidewalk Poet Erin Lierl joins our show for a new segment, The Week in Louisiana Poetry.  For her first visit with us, whe reads her poem, "My Miracle."
  2. This week in Louisiana history. September 26, 1810. American settlers who live in western portion of Spanish West Florida, seize fort at Baton Rouge and declare region between New Orleans and Pearl River to Republic of West Florida and seek annexation to U.S.
  3. This week in New Orleans history.  Mayor Ray Nagin officially reopened the French Quarter on September 26, 2005 to business owners to inspect property and clean up.
  4. This week in Louisiana.
    Calca Chew Food Festival
    September 28, 2014
    Saint Margaret Catholic Church 
    Lake Charles, LA 70601
    (337) 439-4585
    7 am - 3 pm
    The festival is designed for people who want to experience a taste of 'Cajun'. The music is really French, as is the food. For those who have never tasted boudin or jambalaya or have never experienced the two‑step, will find this festival a delight. Our live auction is filled with items all can afford and our silent auction is a shoppers' paradise.
    The French mass starts off the festival at 7 a.m. and during the day, visitors can enjoy games, a live auction, raffles, a petting zoo, train rides and great Cajun music and food. Admission is free. 
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Friday, September 18, 2015

122. Mike Stagg, Part 2

122.  Mike Stagg interview, part 2.  Mike is active in Louisiana politics. He has been working for positive change in Louisiana through technology-based community and economic development initiatives at the regional, state and local levels for the past 20 years. And he has been actively focused on environmental, energy, and taxation issues for the past five years.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. September 19, 1890. President Harrison signs bill killing Louisiana State Lottery Co.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. September 19, 1947.  Hurricane George.  Katrina was not the first storm to breach the infamous 17th Street Canal. There were several breaks in the canal's levee caused by the hurricane of 1947 when the levees broke on the Jefferson Parish side, flooding wide areas of Metairie. Portions of the Orleans Parish lakefront and Gentilly also flooded in this storm.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Arts Market of New Orleans ‑ September
    September 26, 2015
    10:00 am - 4:00 pm
    Palmer Park - New Orleans, LA 70118 
    Presented by the Arts Council of New Orleans, the Arts Market is a free open‑air festival of creativity held the last Saturday of every month at Palmer Park in the Carrollton section of New Orleans (where South Claiborne and South Carrollton Avenues meet)‑ the last stop of the St. Charles streetcar from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. The Arts Market also has live music performances, food and beverage booths, and a Kids Tent with a creative show & crafts.
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Friday, September 11, 2015

121 Mike Stagg, Part 1

121.  Part one of our interview with Mike Stagg.  Mike is active in Louisiana politics.  Mike is active in Louisiana politics. He has been working for positive change in Louisiana through technology-based community and economic development initiatives at the regional, state and local levels for the past 20 years. And he has been actively focused on environmental, energy, and taxation issues for the past five years.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. September 13, 1987. Pope John Paul II begins three day visit to New Orleans.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. September 12, 2005Heckuvajob Day.  Michael D. Brown resigned as Director of FEMA for, "the best interest of the agency and the best interest of the president."  Officials awarded a $30.9 million contract to repair the, "twin spans" I-10 bridge to New Orleans to Boh Brothers Construction Co. on September 12, 2005. It was estimated that 45 days would be required before the bridge could reopen to normal traffic. Water pressure had now been restored in the majority of the Jefferson Parish. A "boil water" order was still in force on the East Bank, but had been lifted for the West Bank. On the East Bank, 17% of sewage pumps were operational, and 39% were operational on the West Bank.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    The Bowie Festival & Bowie BBQ Throwdown
    September 25 - 26, 2015
    Riverview RV Park & Resort - Vidalia, LA
    Contact Ann Westmoreland or Glen McGlothin
    Join us in Vidalia, Louisiana - We will be Grillin' and Chillin' on the beautiful banks of the Mighty Mississippi River.  Vendors with authentic items, great festival and Louisiana foods, State Championship BBQ cook-off (KCBS Sanctioned), Entertainment you will not want to miss!!!  Every year - the last weekend of September.
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Friday, September 4, 2015

120. Dixon Hearne Update Interview

120.  We talk again with writer Dixon Hearne, who teaches and writes in the American South. In recent months, he has moved back home to Louisiana.  He's now in Sterlington, LA, near Monroe.  Much of his writing draws greatly from the rich images in his daily life growing up along the graceful river traces and bayous in West Monroe, Louisiana. After many years of university teaching and writing for research journals, his interests turned toward fiction and poetry—and the challenge of writing in a different voice. The Louisiana Anthology now has some of Dixon's stories for you to enjoy, and links to more.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. September 6, 1717. John Law's Company of the West chartered.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. De La Sallle High School, operated by the Christian Brothers, opened the doors to 76 Catholic freshman boys on Tuesday, September 6, 1949 in an old house on Pitt Street.  The brothers added a new class level each year, operating in several other old structures on the property spanning the 5300 block of St. Charles Avenue, between Valmont and Leontine streets, which the Archdiocese of New Orleans had purchased in April 1949 for $312,000. On Sunday, February 17, 1952 at 2 p.m., Archbishop Rummel officiated the formal dedication of the current De La Salle high school building which had been constructed at a cost of $375,000 to accommodate 750 students. 
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Lydia Cajun Food Fest
    September 11 - 12, 2015
    Weeks Park - Lydia, LA 70569
    Cajun Food Cook‑off, Food Court, Carnival, Arts & Crafts, Poker Run, Refreshments, Music.
    Cajun food certainly has its followers. On menus nationwide, you’ll find things like “Blackened Chicken Salad” or “Cajun Popcorn Shrimp.” As a general rule, these things are usually pale derivatives of the real thing. If you’re interested in the real thing, you’d be wise to be in the small town of Lydia, Louisiana, in September for its annual Cajun Food Fest.
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Friday, August 28, 2015

119. Interview with J. Dawn, Part 2

119.  Part 2 of our interview with J. Dawn, the author of Ashes of Betrayal in The Magicis Chronicles series. J. Dawn is the author of a growing series of books called the Magicis Chronicles. These books are set in the near future, where magic forces that have always been among us have become public.  New Orleans is one of the centers of magic, so the characters will be making their way to the Big Easy at some point in the next book.  Join us as we talk to J. Dawn about her magic series.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. August 29, 1962. Heaviest rainfall in 24 hour period, 22 inches at Sabine Wildlife Refuge
  2. This week in New Orleans history.   August 29, 2005.  Katrina breached the levees.  The city and metropolitan area were underwater in the aftermath of the hurricane.  This date should never pass without a pause to honor the memory of all who were lost that day.  And to remember or try not to remember all else that was lost.  Near  the bottom of this page is a time-line of the events which occurred on August 29, 2005.  If you choose not to "go there" (literally or figuratively) stop reading when you reach the bottom section.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    September 4-5, 2015
    Cane River Zydeco Festival & Poker Run
    August 29 - 30, 2014
    Downtown Riverbank
    Natchitoches, LA 71457
    All musical events are held on the downtown stage in the historic district. Poker Run events will cover specified routes throughout Natchitoches Parish.
    Phone: Melvin Holmes 318-471-9960 or 354-0899
    Harman Winters 318-652-0079 or 354-1077
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Friday, August 21, 2015

118. J. Dawn, author of the Magicis Chronicles. Part 1.

118.  We interview J. Dawn, the author of Ashes of Betrayal inThe Magicis Chronicles series. J. Dawn is the author of a growing series of books called the Magicis Chronicles. These books are set in the near future, where magic forces that have always been among us have become public.  New Orleans is one of the centers of magic, so the characters will be making their way to the Big Easy at some point in the next book.  Join us as we talk to J. Dawn about her magic series.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. August 22, 1701. Jean Baptiste Le Moyne Bienville succeeds Ensign de Sauvolle (Sauvolle's first name is unknown) as commandant of Louisiana.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. On August 22, 1947, a hurricane passed offshore Grand Isle. Sabine Pass reported a 3.6 foot storm surge as the storm hit the Upper Texas coast September 19th, 1947: Hurricane force winds first reached the Mississippi and Louisiana shores at 6 a.m. and New Orleans at 8 a.m.. Gusts to 125 m.p.h. were estimated at Moisant International Airport (highest gust measured was 112 m.p.h.) and the pressure fell to 28.57".  A fifteen foot storm surge overcame the Bay St. Louis seawall. Ostrica saw an 11.5 foot surge and Shell Beach experienced an 11.2 foot storm surge. Water was 6 feet deep in Jefferson Parish. The air fields at Moisant were under 2 feet of water, closing the airport during its second year of operation. This storm demonstrated the dire need for tidal protection levees for New Orleans. Much of the city was flooded, and $100 million in damage was produced. The storm claimed 51 victims, 12 in Louisiana.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    39th Annual Gueydan Duck Festival
    August 27-30, 2015
    The first festival was held in November of 1977 and has grown considerably each year. Held originally on blocked-off streets in Gueydan, the Duck festival moved to its own grounds in 1980 when the Atlantic-Richfield Company donated 7 acres to the Gueydan Duck Festival and the Vermilion Parish Police Jury.  Early in 1996, the Gueydan Duck Festival Association purchased a 10 acre tract of land adjacent to the existing festival grounds complete with lighting and metal buildings for all the festival activities.
    P.O. Box 179 
    Gueydan, LA. 70542
    404 Dallas Guidry Rd
    Gueydan, LA. 70542
    Phone: 337-536-6456
    Fax: 337- 536-9997
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