Friday, August 10, 2018

273. Kimberly Jochum Johnson, part 2

273. Kimberly Jochum Johnson, part 2. We talk to Kimberly Jochum Johnson about City Park and about her work as the Processing Archivist/ Records Analyst at the Archdiocese of New Orleans. City Park is as magical and unique as the city of New Orleans. The 1,300-acre outdoor oasis has enchanted New Orleanians since 1854, making it one of the nation’s oldest urban parks. Each year, millions of visitors stroll under the same historic oaks and picturesque moss canopies that served as the backdrop for dances, concerts and even gentlemanly duels or “affaires d’honneur” for generations.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. August 11, 1856. A hurricane kills more than 200 people vacationing at Isle Derniere (Last Island).
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The 1929 vintage bridge carrying Highway 90 over Chef Menteur Pass was repaired and re-opened to traffic on August 11, 2006 after it had been closed due to  Hurricane Katrina damage. Meanwhile the modern I-10 Twin Span (now Frank Davis bridge) was in need of a complete rebuild.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Natchitoches Meat Pie Festival
    Front Street Downtown
    Natchitoches, LA
    OR
    450 Fairgrounds Road near the airport (We found both addresses)
    Sept 14-15, 2018
    Hot air balloons, balloon glow, tethered balloon rides,
    live entertainment, children’s activities, meat pie vendors, arts & crafts, spectacular fireworks event and so much more. 
  4. The Superband plays on Royal St. to raise money for Hector Gallardo, a Cuban drummer who has lived in New Orleans for decades.
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Friday, August 3, 2018

272. Kimberly Jochum Johnson, part 1

272. Part 1 of our interview with Kimberly Jochum Johnson about City Park and about her work as the Processing Archivist/ Records Analyst at the Archdiocese of New Orleans. City Park is as magical and unique as the city of New Orleans. The 1,300-acre outdoor oasis has enchanted New Orleanians since 1854, making it one of the nation’s oldest urban parks. Each year, millions of visitors stroll under the same historic oaks and picturesque moss canopies that served as the backdrop for dances, concerts and even gentlemanly duels or “affaires d’honneur” for generations.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. August 4, 1901. Allen Greene school opens in town of Grambling, will later become Grambling State Univ.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The Sun Belt (athletic) Conference was founded on August 4, 1976 with the University of New Orleans, the University of South Alabama, Georgia State University, Jacksonville University, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and the University of South Florida.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Louisiana Shrimp & Petroleum Festival
    August 30-September 3, 2018
    Lawrence Park
    Morgan City, LA
    715 Second Street
    P.O. Box 103
    Morgan City, LA
    Phone: 985.385.0703
    Fax: 985.384.4628
    Festival Information: info@shrimp-petrofest.org
       It all began over 70 years ago, when the placid port at Morgan City and Berwick received the first boatload of jumbo shrimp, fresh from the deepest waters ever fished by a small boat. The very first celebration was held, appropriately on Labor Day, when members of the local unit of Gulf Coast Seafood Producers & Trappers Association, in recognition of the holiday, staged a friendly labor demonstration that has come to be known as the first festival. There were frog and alligator hunters, shrimpers, crab fishermen, dock workers and oystermen parading in the streets. Of course, it was not the grand procession that it is today, but it was the first street parade nonetheless.
  4. Bruce listens to a 2nd line band on Royal Street.
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Friday, July 27, 2018

271. Charlie Stephens, Part 2

271. Part 2 of our interview with Charlie Stephens, President of the High School Democrats of Louisiana. Charlie is a high school student at Lee High School in Baton Rouge. Charlie is not only a leader of the Louisiana High School Democrats at Lee High School; he is also the head of the organization for the whole state. Charlie recognizes that we have to regrow the Democratic Party from the ground up, and there's no better place to start than in school.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. July 30, 1812. William Charles Cole Claiborne becomes the 1st Governor of the state of Louisiana.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. German American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church James Hubert Herbert Blenk, S.M. (July 28, 1856 – April 20, 1917) served as Bishop of Puerto Rico (1899–1906) and Archbishop of New Orleans (1906–1917).
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    39th Annual Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival July 20-21, 2018
       The 39th annual Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival will be held inside air-conditioned Prather Coliseum on the Northwestern State University campus in Natchitoches, Louisiana. The 2018 festival theme is "Celebrating Louisiana's Folk Roots."
       The festival will include a wide variety of traditional crafts, folk foods, Kidfest, three stages with live music, narrative sessions, music informances, and a Cajun fiddle workshop, which will be free for Festival attendees. In addition, the annual Louisiana State Fiddle Championship will be held in the Magale Recital Hall on the afternoon of July 21.
       Crafts, exhibits, and Kidfest will be presented on Saturday from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm.
  4. Bruce and Kerr talk to a couple of vegans at the New Orleans VeganFest.
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Friday, July 20, 2018

270. Charlie Stephens, part 1

270. Part 1 of our interview with Charlie Stephens, President of the High School Democrats of Louisiana. Charlie is a high school student at Lee High School in Baton Rouge. Charlie is not only a leader of the Louisiana High School Democrats at Lee High School; he is also the head of the organization for the whole state. Charlie recognizes that we have to regrow the Democratic Party from the ground up, and there's no better place to start than in school.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. July 22, 1923. Ted Lyons (Vinton) pitched his first major league baseball game.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The Southern Yacht Club's organizational meeting was held on July 21, 1849  at the Pass Christian Hotel, which became its headquarters until 1857 when the club relocated to New Orleans and held its regattas on Lake Pontchartrain.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Delcambre Shrimp Festival
    August 15-19, 2018
    The town devotes an entire weekend to honor this economic lifeblood. Events include a shrimp cook-off, queens pageants, fais-do-do's, food booths, carnival rides, and the blessing of the shrimp boat fleet. There's plenty of fun for "kids" of all ages and lots to see, hear, and EAT!
  4. A group of Dead Heads play on Decatur St.
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Thursday, July 19, 2018

269a. Mimi Methvin

269a. We interview congressional candidate Mimi Methvin about her campaign to represent Louisiana's 3rd Congressional District in the House of Representatives. With 28 years’ experience as a federal and state judge along with a track record as a successful attorney and mediator, Mimi knows how to lead opposing sides to work together and find solutions. She’s also a mother, a yoga instructor, and a genealogist. Mimi believes the spirit of civility, respect and integrity that this country was founded on must be reignited to preserve our democratic institutions. She wants to bring her common sense, skill and intellectual honesty to Washington as a strong voice for the people of Louisiana’s Third Congressional District.


Thursday, July 12, 2018

269. Langston A. Williams, Part 2

269. Part 2 of our interview with filmmaker Langston A. Williams. Langston didn’t start off with a plan to make a social commentary as his master’s thesis film at the University of New Orleans. But the summer after Williams finished writing the screenplay for a horror short, a 37-year-old named Alton Sterling was shot by police officers in Baton Rouge. Williams discovered then that he had an entirely different screenplay in him – one about race, police brutality and the media. “The story almost wrote itself,” said Williams (M.F.A.,’17). Now, Williams’ 25-minute short film, “Stay Woke,” is racking up honors on the film festival circuit and, most impressively, was invited to be screened at the Cannes Film Festival’s Short Film Corner on May 17, a first for a student film made through UNO’s Department of Film & Theatre program.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. July 14, 1937. First piling driven for N.O. Charity Hospital.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Bob Hope came to New Orleans on July 14, 1955 to play in a golf match at Lakewood Country Club to benefit the United Cerebral Palsy Association. When the match had to be called off because of bad weather, Hope instead made two personal appearances at the Saenger Theater.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
       The International Grand Isle Tarpon Rodeo is held during the last weekend in July that includes the Sunday. Please fill out the registration form below and mail to
    P.O. Box 25
    Des Allemands, LA 70030
    by the deadline of July 16th.
       Registrations received after Friday July 16th will not be processed via mail.
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Tanya Huang plays a song by Evanescence on Royal St. 
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Thursday, July 5, 2018

268. Langston A. Williams, Part 1

268. Part 1 of our interview with filmmaker Langston A. Williams. Langston didn’t start off with a plan to make a social commentary as his master’s thesis film at the University of New Orleans. But the summer after Williams finished writing the screenplay for a horror short, a 37-year-old named Alton Sterling was shot by police officers in Baton Rouge. Williams discovered then that he had an entirely different screenplay in him – one about race, police brutality and the media. “The story almost wrote itself,” said Williams (M.F.A.,’17). Now, Williams’ 25-minute short film, “Stay Woke,” is racking up honors on the film festival circuit and, most impressively, was invited to be screened at the Cannes Film Festival’s Short Film Corner on May 17, a first for a student film made through UNO’s Department of Film & Theatre program.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. July 7, 1912. Grabow 'Lumber War' shootout takes place near DeRidder, 3 killed, 37 wounded.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Beginning in the mid-1930s, and for several years after, the Recreation Project of the WPA sponsored the "Summer Showers" program in conjunction with the New Orleans Fire Department. Several days a week throughout the summer, firemen closed off a street, opened the hydrants and attached special nozzles to their hoses so the children of New Orleans could frolic and beat the heat. Opening day of the Summer Showers program was traditionally celebrated with a certain amount of pomp and circumstance. City and WPA leaders gathered at Engine House 26, 231 S. Broad, for the ceremonial turning on of the showers. Opening day festivities too place on Broad Street, July 7, 1939.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Cajun Music and Food Festival
    July 20, 2018 to July 21, 2018
    Friday 4pm-11pm & Saturday 9am-11pm
    Admission: $8.00 - Children under 12 Free
    (337) 794-2541
    Burton Coliseum
    7001 Gulf Hwy
    Lake Charles, LA 70605
    Celebrating 31 years of preserving and promoting Cajun music and heritage with continuous live Cajun music, traditional Cajun foods, arts and crafts, Cajun waltz and two-step dance contests, and children's activities all at Burton Coliseum starting at 4:00 to 11:00 PM, Friday, July 20th and again Saturday, July 21 9:00 AM to 11:00 PM. In addition, we have a Cajun French mass and donut social on Sunday morning at 8:00 AM at the CFMA Building and Museum located at 3481 E, Prien Lake Road, Lake Charles.
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Frog & Henry plays on Frenchmen St.
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Friday, June 29, 2018

267. Walter Stern

267. This week we interview Walter Stern. From the Code Noir to today, New Orleans has had a complicated racial history. Surveying the two centuries that preceded Jim Crow’s demise, Race and Education in New Orleans traces the course of the city’s education system from the colonial period to the start of school desegregation in 1960. This timely historical analysis reveals that public schools in New Orleans both suffered from and maintained the racial stratification that characterized urban areas for much of the twentieth century.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 30, 1870. Robert E. Lee and the Natchez began their famous riverboat race.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. One of the lengthiest and most violent transit railway strikes the nation ever experienced began in New Orleans on July 1, 1929. Although an agreement was reached in August, the union members did not agree to go back to work until October.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    2018 Essence Festival
    July 5-8, 2018
    The Essence Festival, known as "the party with a purpose", is an annual music festival which started in 1995 as a one-time event to celebrate the 25th anniversary of Essence, a magazine aimed primarily towards African-American women. It is the largest event celebrating African-American culture and music in the United States.
    This years acts include Janet Jackson - Mary J. Blige - Erykah Badu - Jill Scott - Snoop Dogg - The Roots - MC Lyte - Kelly Price - Miguel - Blackstreet - Fantasia - Xscape.
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Tuba Skinny plays another tune at the d.b.a. music bar.
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Walter Stern
The Natchez vs the Robert E. Lee
Tuba Skinny

Thursday, June 28, 2018

266a. Ryan Trundle

266a. We interview candidate Ryan Trundle about his campaign for the 4th Congressional District from Louisiana. This is Ryan's message: "I have been fighting for people and the environment my whole life as an activist, community organizer and volunteer. Most of the time against greedy politicians and the unethical corporations that control them. I am sick and tired of seeing my friends and family being taken advantage of while our elected officials do nothing or worse. It's time for the people to have a voice in Congress, it’s time to fix the broken system, which is why I chose to run. The first step to fixing the corrupt political system is to remove big money special interests which is why I won't be accepting money or support from super PACs or corporations. The next step is to create a government that works for all of us, not just the wealthy, with fair common sense policies. I need your help to do this, please volunteer, donate and most importantly vote. It’s not a democracy without you."

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Friday, June 22, 2018

266. Andy Gellis, part 2

266. Part 2 of our interview with Andy Gellis about his book, BigABigD's Jewish-Cajun Fusion. As a Jew living in South Louisiana, Andy is interested in both Jewish food and the local Cajun cooking. While there are big differences in the two food cultures, there are some interesting similarities. Andy's book also reflects his interest in blending these two traditions to form a new cuisine. We also talk to Andy about eating kosher, about New York Jewish delis, and Jewish food in the Old World.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 23, 1813. Records show W.C.C. Claiborne used pelican and motto as state seal for first time.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The evening of June 23, St John's Eve (also known as Midsummer because it falls on or near the summer solstice), is the eve of celebration before the Feast Day of St John the Baptist. The Christian holy day is fixed at June 24 but in some countries, festivities are celebrated the night before. In New Orleans, St. John's Eve has traditionally been celebrated by voodoo practitioners. A June 23, 1884 edition of the New Orleans Times-Democrat reported “Eve of St. John” activities; “The queen in attendance” as well as a “scene on the lake coast from Spanish Fort to Milneburg was one which cannot easily be forgotten.”
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Louisiana Cajun Zydeco Festival
    Jun 23–24, 2018
    Saturday, June 23, and Sunday, June 24, 2018 - 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. both days
    Louis Armstrong Park
    701 N. Rampart Street
    New Orleans, Louisiana 70116
    Admission: Free
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. A street band plays on Frenchmen and Chartres Streets. Frenchmen has become the nighttime alternative to Bourbon St. with more locals attending and fewer strip joints. 
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Friday, June 15, 2018

265. Andy Gellis, part 1

265. Part 1 of our interview with Andy Gellis about his book, BigABigD's Jewish-Cajun Fusion. As a Jew living in South Louisiana, Andy is interested in both Jewish food and the local Cajun cooking. While there are big differences in the two food cultures, there are some interesting similarities. Andy's book also reflects his interest in blending these two traditions to form a new cuisine. We also talk to Andy about eating kosher, about New York Jewish delis, and Jewish food in the Old World.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 16, 1964. Two barges ram Lake Ponchartrain Causeway tearing the structure and killing six.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Z.Z.Top and Wishbone Ash played at A Warehouse on June 16, 1972.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Beauregard Watermelon Festival
    June 29-30, 2018
    The Beauregard Watermelon Festival has several events: watermelon carving, a t-shirt contest, a singing contest, a seed spitting contest, biggest watermelon contest, and more.
    (337) 463-5534
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Tuba Skinny plays at the d.b.a. music bar.
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Friday, June 8, 2018

264. Mark Broyard, part 2.

264. Part 2 of our interview with Mark Broyard. Mark is descended from a long line of artisans and craftsmen who have plied their trade in New Orleans and Los Angeles. His mother's father was a furniture maker in the Vieux Carree.  His own father was a third generation bricklayer as well as a building contractor.  Mark cites these influences as being the strongest on his work. Mark and Roger Guenveur Smith have a two-man show, Inside the Creole Mafia, a not-too-dark comedy presenting a contemporary take on a mixed-blood heritage that emerged in the collision of slavery and freedom. In the 18th and 19th centuries they were the "Gens de Couleur Libres," the Free People of Color but today they are commonly known as "Creoles" or "Creoles of Color." With a blend of humor and savvy mockery, performers Mark Broyard and Roger Guenveur Smith rock the stage in big daddy white suits, silk shirts and ties, pouring Tabasco sauce libations while they "trow" Mardi Gras beads.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 9, 1867. Benjamin F. Flanders appointed Military Governor of La. by Gen. Sheridan.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The Haspell Doll Collection, installed June 9, 1941, attracted numerous persons to the New Orleans Public Library. This group of 500 dolls from practically every nation is perhaps the finest in the South. Its value to students of geography and costume has been outstanding.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Louisiana Catfish Festival
    June 22-24, 2018
    The festival is held on the grounds of St. Gertrude the Great Catholic Church in Des Allemands.
    17324 La. 631
    Des Allemands, La. 70030
    From New Orleans, take I-10 W to I-310. Head south on I-310 for about 12 miles. Exit to the right on Hwy. 90 W to Houma. Continue on Hwy. 90 W through Paradis to Des Allemands. Upon reaching Des Allemands,  St. Gertrude the Great Catholic Church will be on the right side of LA 631 in the Des Allemands Business District.
    Des Allemands, LA
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. The Stay Outsiders play on Royal Street.
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Roger Smith (top) and Mark Broyard
The Stay Outsiders

Friday, June 1, 2018

263. Mark Broyard, part 1.

263. Part 1 of our interview with Mark Broyard. Mark is descended from a long line of artisans and craftsmen who have plied their trade in New Orleans and Los Angeles. His mother's father was a furniture maker in the Vieux Carree.  His own father was a third generation bricklayer as well as a building contractor.  Mark cites these influences as being the strongest on his work. Mark and Roger Guenveur Smith have a two-man show, Inside the Creole Mafia, a not-too-dark comedy presenting a contemporary take on a mixed-blood heritage that emerged in the collision of slavery and freedom. In the 18th and 19th centuries they were the "Gens de Couleur Libres," the Free People of Color but today they are commonly known as "Creoles" or "Creoles of Color." With a blend of humor and savvy mockery, performers Mark Broyard and Roger Guenveur Smith rock the stage in big daddy white suits, silk shirts and ties, pouring Tabasco sauce libations while they "trow" Mardi Gras beads.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 3, 1902. Legislature makes June 3, Confederate Day, a legal holiday.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. On June 2, 1944, the Liberty ship Walker D. Hines was launched by Delta Shipbuilding Company.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Louisiana Peach Fest
    "Peachy Paradise"
    June 22-23, 2018
    The Louisiana Peach Festival is a family-oriented event produced by the Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce, and held each year the fourth weekend of June. The 2018 dates are June 22-23.
    Children 8 and Under get in Free!
    Friday, Free for all, Noon - 5 p.m.
    Friday, $10, 5 p.m. - 10 p.m.
    Saturday, $10, 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.
    Weekend Pass, $15
    Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce:
    (318) 255-2031
    (800) 392-9032
    Email: peach@rustonlincoln.org
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. A street band plays on Toulouse & Bourbon Streets.
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Roger Smith (top) and Mark Broyard

Friday, May 25, 2018

262. Lamar White visits for our 5th Anniversary

262. This week, we mark our 5th anniversary as a podcast and the 6th anniversary of our overall project. Friend of the podcast Lamar White joins us to read and discuss a couple of his articles on the history of LABI. These articles can be found at The Bayou Brief; part 1 is "Louisiana’s Fourth Branch of Government, 1976-1991"; part 2 is "Louisiana’s Fourth Branch of Government, A Banana Republic Open for Business"; During the past 20 years, a small group of anti-government ideologues has transformed state politics by preaching fiscal responsibility. Quietly, they’ve also collected billions in tax breaks, incentives, and government contracts. LABI is one of the primary reasons for the gridlock in Baton Rouge, keeping the state from solving its problems.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. May 26, 1865 Civil War finally ends in La. as Army of Trans-Miss. surrenders in New Orleans.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. A most appropriate photograph to share on Memorial Day, this one from the New Orleans Public Library captures soldiers from the various camps in Louisiana and Mississippi who came to New Orleans for brief periods of weekend leaves and are shown around the city by guides supplied by the WPA recreation division. Here the WPA guide is in Jackson Square with a group of military tourists on May 26, 1941.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    The Louisiana Corn Festival is held every year the second full weekend in June. The festival and slogan “Aw Shucks” originated in 1986 and still is the only corn festival in the state of Louisiana. The name Louisiana Corn Festival was given to honor the impact that agriculture has on our economy and a Corn Farmer is honored each year. This festival has something for all ages. There is music every night with live bands Friday and Saturday night with a street dance, games, contests, corn cooking contest, children's parade, pirogue races, corn shucking contest and corn eating contest! This year we will host our 2nd Annual Car, Truck, and Bike Show on Saturday, June 9th. So follow the rows of corn down to Bunkie, where you are sure to have a corn shucking good time!!
       Bunkie will celebrate the 32nd Annual Corn Festival on June 7, 8, & 9, 2018. Carnival Bracelets to ride all night on Thursday & Friday are $20, Saturday ALL DAY bracelets are $25 and individual ride tickets are available for purchase. Gate Entrance is $3 for 21 and up and $1 for 20 and below. Thursday’s Family night has no gate entrance fee. Our city wide parade will roll Saturday at 10am. Join our community this year and help us celebrate 32 years!
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. The Tip Jar Junkie plays on Royal St.
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Lamar White
Tip Jar Junkie
Soldiers on Leave in New Orleans

Thursday, May 17, 2018

261. Karen Celestan

261. We talk to Karen Celestan about her book, Freedom's Dance, which covers social aid and pleasure clubs, along with second line parades. In this book, the powerful images of noted photographer Eric Waters are paired with a collection of essays by cultural leaders to offer the first complete look at the Social, Aid and Pleasure Club (SAPC) parade culture in New Orleans. Ranging from ideological approaches to the contributions of musicians, development of specific rituals by various clubs, and parade accessories such as elaborately decorated fans and sashes, Freedom’s Dance provides an unparalleled photographic and textual overview of the SAPC Second Line, tracking its origins in African traditions and subsequent development in black New Orleans culture.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. May 19, 1862. Union Gen. Benjamin "Beast" Butler Order no. 28 published.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Jazz musician George Murphy "Pops" Foster (May 19, 1892 – October 29, 1969) played string bass, tuba and trumpet. Born on a plantation near McCall in Ascension Parish, his family moved to New Orleans when he was about ten years of age. His older brother, Willard Foster, began playing banjo and guitar; George started out on a cello then switched to string bass.  Foster was playing professionally by 1907 and worked with Jack Carey, Kid Ory, Armand Piron, King Oliver and other prominent hot bands of the era. In 1921 he moved to St. Louis.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Little Walter Music Festival
    May 24-25, 2018
    Red River Levee stage
    800.551.9546
    Honor Little Walter's legacy. The Little Walter Music Festival is a festival held at the Alexandria Amphitheater in Alexandria, La. honoring Rock & Roll Hall of Famer, Blues sideman and bandleader "Little Walter." For a complete list of entertainment visit the Little Walter Music Festival Facebook page. The event is free.
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. The Superband, made up of New Orleans muscians, plays to raise money for Hector Gallardo. He leads the group Hector Gallardo & his Cuban Jazz Trio. He brought his unique percussion sound from Cuba when he immigrated decades ago, and he has made a profound impact on the New Orleans music scene. 
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Thursday, May 10, 2018

260. Joseph Makkos, part 2.

260. Part 2 of our interview with Joseph Makkos. For years, Joseph salvaged letterpresses and boxes of rare type from local print shops. He was trawling through Craigslist one day in 2013 when he came upon an ad for a “historic newspaper collection.” Hours later, he had become the proud owner of a Times-Picayune archive from 1885 up to 1930, a collection carefully preserved in some 30,000 airtight tubes. Inspired by other print conservation efforts, Makkos launched New Orleans DNA to not only preserve his newspapers but also nurture an appreciation for their true pricelessness.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. May 12, 1898. New constitution includes the "Grandfather Clause" to permit illiterate whites to vote; a poll tax and literacy test included to disqualify black voters.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. World's Fair Opens. Saturday, May 12, 1984. Crowds flocked to see Seymour D. Fair, the Wonder Wall, the gondolas, the bare-breasted mermaids, synchronized swimmers, and much more (not to mention the food) on opening day, May 12, 1984. Themed "The World of Rivers—Fresh Waters as a Source of Life", the fair took place 100 years after the 1884 World Cotton Centennial (aka World's Fair) which occupied grounds we now know of as Audubon Park.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    26th Starks Mayhaw Festival
    May 17-19, 2018
       Our festival celebrates the best tasting jelly around. Be sure to stop by and buy some Mayhaw jelly. Our vendors also create numerous other berry jellies. Arts & Crafts, Live Entertainment, auction, Great Food, Jelly Contest, Live Auction, Car Show, Kids Games, Carnival Rides.
       Our festival is held each year on 13 acre site at the intersection of Hwy 109 & Hwy 12 in Starks, LA.
    105 Hwy 109 North
    Starks, LA 70661
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. The Taser Family Band plays on Royal St. They are available at 615.480.6037.
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Taser Family Band.

Friday, May 4, 2018

259. Joseph Makkos, part 1

259.  Part 1 of our interview with Joseph Makkos. For years, Joseph salvaged letterpresses and boxes of rare type from local print shops. He was trawling through Craigslist one day in 2013 when he came upon an ad for a “historic newspaper collection.” Hours later, he had become the proud owner of a Times-Picayune archive from 1885 up to 1930, a collection carefully preserved in some 30,000 airtight tubes. Inspired by other print conservation efforts, Makkos launched New Orleans DNA to not only preserve his newspapers but also nurture an appreciation for their true pricelessness.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. May 4, 1970. T.H. Williams wins Pulitzer Prize for his biography, Huey Long.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The Inner Harbor-Navigation Canal, commonly known to New Orleanians as the Industrial Canal, was formally opened on, May 5, 1923. 
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    44th Annual Cochon De Lait Festival
    Mansura, Louisiana
    May 10-13, 2018
       The Cochon de Lait Festival is held annually on the second full weekend in May in Mansura, Louisiana. Mansura is the Cochon de Lait capital of the world. The festival mixes great Cajun food, good times and Louisiana music with the famous cochon de lait (French for roast suckling pig). There is plenty to see and do for the entire family to “pass a good time.”
       From the Children's Pig Pen to the Greasy Pig contest and the Cracklin Cook-off in between, we have something for you. Please join us in Mansura to celebrate this wonderful testament to the "cochon!"
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. The Superband, made up of New Orleans muscians, plays to raise money for Hector Gallardo. He leads the group Hector Gallardo & his Cuban Jazz Trio. He brought his unique percussion sound from Cuba when he immigrated decades ago, and he has made a profound impact on the New Orleans music scene.
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Friday, April 27, 2018

258. Charles Lane. The Colfax Massacre.

258. We interview Washington Post journalist Charles Lane, who wrote a book on the Colfax Massacre entitled The Day Freedom Died: The Colfax Massacre and the Betrayal of Reconstruction. Here is the epic tale of the Colfax Massacre, the mass murder of more than sixty black men on Easter Sunday 1873 that propelled a small Louisiana town into the center of the nation’s consciousness.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 28, 1761. Gov. Jacques Pilippe, born in Jefferson Parish.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. On Saturday, April 30, 1803, the Louisiana Purchase Treaty was signed by Robert Livingston, James Monroe, and Barbé Marbois in Paris. Jefferson announced the treaty to the American people on July 4. After the signing of the Louisiana Purchase agreement in 1803, Livingston made this famous statement, "We have lived long, but this is the noblest work of our whole lives...From this day the United States take their place among the powers of the first rank."
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Ahoy! It's the
    The Louisiana Pirate Festival
    May 3-13, 2018
    Experience our unique pirate and seafaring festival with events on both land and sea, including watercraft exhibitions and a fireworks display over the lake.
       On the shores of historic Lake Charles, the Louisiana Pirate Festival showcases entertainment by a variety of talented musicians, performers and artists.  Plus, this year’s festival also includes the inaugural Louisiana Pirate Festival Costume Ball and the first-ever Louisiana Pirate Festival Parade Extravaganza!
       Join us for a family-friendly event with cannon demonstrations, costume contests, local arts and crafts, themed souvenirs, a boat parade, a Little Matey Children’s Area with Captain Crabbe, a petting zoo and inflatables, daily Buccaneer parades on site, pirogue building and rain gutter pirate ship races, games and attractions, including the acclaimed Todd Armstrong Carnival, a Barbecue Competitors Alliance Cajun Pirate BBQ Cook-Off and more. And don't miss our Culinary Coffer where you'll discover a treasure of great Pirate-pleasing foods. Shiver me timbers, we’re going to have some fun!
  4. Postcards from the Resistance. We talk to Alex Bozeman, who spoke at this week's Earth Day Rally in Ruston, LA.
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Alex Bozeman

Thursday, April 19, 2018

257. Mark Bologna, part 2

257. Part 2 of our conversation with Mark Bologna, host of the Beyond Bourbon Street podcast. We were excited to find another podcast with a similar focus to ours. "My name is Mark Bologna and I’ll be your guide on this journey. I was born and raised in New Orleans, and specifically in Gentilly, a neighborhood just down the road from Lake Pontchartrain in the heart of the city. I love my hometown and can’t wait to share it with you!" Mark would like to hear from you and help you plan your trip to the Big Easy. Find out more here.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 21, 1804. Gov. Laussat, last French Gov., leaves Louisiana.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. According to the Amistad Research Center, The Reverse Freedom Rides of 1962 were a deliberate parody of the Freedom Rides organized by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) in the previous year. Also called the Freedom Rides North, African American "participants" in the Reverse Freedom Rides were offered free one-way transportation and the promise of free housing and guaranteed employment to Northern cities. George Singelmann of the Greater New Orleans Citizens' Council orchestrated the Reverse Freedom Rides, which served as the Citizens' Councils' means of testing the sincerity of Northern liberals' quest for equality for African Americans. This attempt to embarrass Northern critics of the Citizens' Councils was a way of, in Singelmann's words, "telling the North to put up or shut up." Public outcry against the Reverse Freedom Rides was swift and direct, with groups such as the Urban League of Greater New Orleans leading the chorus of disapproval. WDSU Radio released a statement in April 1962, that typifies the response: "WDSU believes the Freedom Bus North movement is sick sensationalism bordering on moronic."
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Jazz Fest 2018!
    April 27-May 6, 2018
    The 48th New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.
    New Orleans Fair Grounds
    1751 Gentilly Boulevard
    New Orleans, LA
    This is the #1 music festival in New Orleans, with over a week's worth of world-class entertainment. This year's entertainment includes Sting, Sturgill Simpson, Steel Pulse, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, Ron Carter Trio, The Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Jon Cleary, Samantha Fish, Davell Crawford, Jake Shimabukuro, Wayne Toups, Luther Kent & Trickbag, Bobby Rush, Leslie Odom Jr., Eric Lindell, Sidi Toure of Mali, BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet, Big Chief Donald Harrison, Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah, Chubby Carrier & the Bayou Swamp Band, and many more.
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Boston Becca plays violin on Royal St.
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Friday, April 13, 2018

256. Mark Bologna, part 1

256 Part 1 of our interview of Mark Bologna, host of the Beyond Bourbon Street podcast. We were excited to find another podcast with a similar focus to ours. "My name is Mark Bologna and I’ll be your guide on this journey. I was born and raised in New Orleans, and specifically in Gentilly, a neighborhood just down the road from Lake Pontchartrain in the heart of the city. I love my hometown and can’t wait to share it with you!" Mark would like to hear from you and help you plan your trip to the Big Easy. Find out more here.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 15, 1795. The Pointe Coupee Slave Rebellion.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. April 16, 1718. Official date of founding of New Orleans.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Bayou Teche Black Bear Festival
    Friday, April 20th and Saturday, April 21st 2018
    Along the Bank of the Bayou Teche
    Downtown Historic Franklin, Louisiana
    We invite you to the Fifteenth Annual Bayou Teche Black Bear Festival, April 20th and 21st 2018 in beautiful downtown Franklin. Franklin, located in the heart of St. Mary Parish along the banks of the Bayou Teche, is noted for its beautiful antebellum homes, quaint bed and breakfasts, and majestic live oaks. The city is surrounded by expansive cypress tupelo swamps, the unique and expansive Atchafalaya Basin. The area has a rich natural heritage, with a bountiful list of species readily available for the wildlife fancier. Among those is the Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus ). Please browse our website for information about the festival including the activities, live music, black bear education and all of the other events to be held and please remember to tell your friends!
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Stretch Adams sings and plays the banjo in the Vieux Carre. 
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Friday, April 6, 2018

255. Pamela Tyler, part 2

255. Part 2 of our interview with Pamela Tyler about women's suffrage in Louisiana. In Silk Stockings & Ballot Boxes, Pamela Tyler examines the activities of organized upper- and middle-class women in New Orleans in the twentieth century, with an emphasis on their behavior in the political arena. Tyler traces the path of women's political activities, from their indirect political influence and women's clubs, to their direct integration into the larger political process. In her narrative, she examines the post-suffrage alternatives that southern women faced in their quest for inclusion in the political arena.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April, 7 1682. LaSalle and Tonti reached mouth of Miss. River.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Major League Baseball pitcher Edward Francis Lafitte was born at 319 Bourbon Street on April 7, 1886.   He played for the Detroit Tigers (1909–12), the Brooklyn Tip-Tops (1914–15), and the Buffalo Blues (1915).  His college days were spent pitching for the Georgia Techbaseball team (1906 and 1907) and as a starter in the first intercollegiate basketball game played by Georgia Tech. He died on April 12, 1971 at the age of 85.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    35th Louisiana Railroad Days Festival
    DeQuincy Railroad Museum Park
    400 Lake Charles Avenue
    DeQuincy LA, 70633
    April 12-14, 2018
    Bands:
    Collin Raye, Southwest Jazz, Rosedown Rockers, Rusty Metoyer and the Zydeko Krush, Gyth Rigdon, and Collin Raye.
    All entertainment is free!!
    Enjoy the day with great music and family fun!
    Full Schedule
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Buku Broux plays the Kora in Jackson Square.
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