Friday, June 15, 2018

265. Andy Gellis, part 1

265. Part 1 of our interview with Andy Gellis about his book, BigABigD's Jewish-Cajun Fusion. As a Jew living in South Louisiana, Andy is interested in both Jewish food and the local Cajun cooking. While there are big differences in the two food cultures, there are some interesting similarities. Andy's book also reflects his interest in blending these two traditions to form a new cuisine. We also talk to Andy about eating kosher, about New York Jewish delis, and Jewish food in the Old World.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 16, 1964. Two barges ram Lake Ponchartrain Causeway tearing the structure and killing six.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Z.Z.Top and Wishbone Ash played at A Warehouse on June 16, 1972.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Beauregard Watermelon Festival
    June 29-30, 2018
    The Beauregard Watermelon Festival has several events: watermelon carving, a t-shirt contest, a singing contest, a seed spitting contest, biggest watermelon contest, and more.
    (337) 463-5534
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Tuba Skinny plays at the d.b.a. music bar.
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Friday, June 8, 2018

264. Mark Broyard, part 2.

264. Part 2 of our interview with Mark Broyard. Mark is descended from a long line of artisans and craftsmen who have plied their trade in New Orleans and Los Angeles. His mother's father was a furniture maker in the Vieux Carree.  His own father was a third generation bricklayer as well as a building contractor.  Mark cites these influences as being the strongest on his work. Mark and Roger Guenveur Smith have a two-man show, Inside the Creole Mafia, a not-too-dark comedy presenting a contemporary take on a mixed-blood heritage that emerged in the collision of slavery and freedom. In the 18th and 19th centuries they were the "Gens de Couleur Libres," the Free People of Color but today they are commonly known as "Creoles" or "Creoles of Color." With a blend of humor and savvy mockery, performers Mark Broyard and Roger Guenveur Smith rock the stage in big daddy white suits, silk shirts and ties, pouring Tabasco sauce libations while they "trow" Mardi Gras beads.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 9, 1867. Benjamin F. Flanders appointed Military Governor of La. by Gen. Sheridan.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The Haspell Doll Collection, installed June 9, 1941, attracted numerous persons to the New Orleans Public Library. This group of 500 dolls from practically every nation is perhaps the finest in the South. Its value to students of geography and costume has been outstanding.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Louisiana Catfish Festival
    June 22-24, 2018
    The festival is held on the grounds of St. Gertrude the Great Catholic Church in Des Allemands.
    17324 La. 631
    Des Allemands, La. 70030
    From New Orleans, take I-10 W to I-310. Head south on I-310 for about 12 miles. Exit to the right on Hwy. 90 W to Houma. Continue on Hwy. 90 W through Paradis to Des Allemands. Upon reaching Des Allemands,  St. Gertrude the Great Catholic Church will be on the right side of LA 631 in the Des Allemands Business District.
    Des Allemands, LA
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. The Stay Outsiders play on Royal Street.
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Roger Smith (top) and Mark Broyard
The Stay Outsiders

Friday, June 1, 2018

263. Mark Broyard, part 1.

263. Part 1 of our interview with Mark Broyard. Mark is descended from a long line of artisans and craftsmen who have plied their trade in New Orleans and Los Angeles. His mother's father was a furniture maker in the Vieux Carree.  His own father was a third generation bricklayer as well as a building contractor.  Mark cites these influences as being the strongest on his work. Mark and Roger Guenveur Smith have a two-man show, Inside the Creole Mafia, a not-too-dark comedy presenting a contemporary take on a mixed-blood heritage that emerged in the collision of slavery and freedom. In the 18th and 19th centuries they were the "Gens de Couleur Libres," the Free People of Color but today they are commonly known as "Creoles" or "Creoles of Color." With a blend of humor and savvy mockery, performers Mark Broyard and Roger Guenveur Smith rock the stage in big daddy white suits, silk shirts and ties, pouring Tabasco sauce libations while they "trow" Mardi Gras beads.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. June 3, 1902. Legislature makes June 3, Confederate Day, a legal holiday.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. On June 2, 1944, the Liberty ship Walker D. Hines was launched by Delta Shipbuilding Company.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Louisiana Peach Fest
    "Peachy Paradise"
    June 22-23, 2018
    The Louisiana Peach Festival is a family-oriented event produced by the Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce, and held each year the fourth weekend of June. The 2018 dates are June 22-23.
    Children 8 and Under get in Free!
    Friday, Free for all, Noon - 5 p.m.
    Friday, $10, 5 p.m. - 10 p.m.
    Saturday, $10, 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.
    Weekend Pass, $15
    Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce:
    (318) 255-2031
    (800) 392-9032
    Email: peach@rustonlincoln.org
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. A street band plays on Toulouse & Bourbon Streets.
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Roger Smith (top) and Mark Broyard

Friday, May 25, 2018

262. Lamar White visits for our 5th Anniversary

262. This week, we mark our 5th anniversary as a podcast and the 6th anniversary of our overall project. Friend of the podcast Lamar White joins us to read and discuss a couple of his articles on the history of LABI. These articles can be found at The Bayou Brief; part 1 is "Louisiana’s Fourth Branch of Government, 1976-1991"; part 2 is "Louisiana’s Fourth Branch of Government, A Banana Republic Open for Business"; During the past 20 years, a small group of anti-government ideologues has transformed state politics by preaching fiscal responsibility. Quietly, they’ve also collected billions in tax breaks, incentives, and government contracts. LABI is one of the primary reasons for the gridlock in Baton Rouge, keeping the state from solving its problems.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. May 26, 1865 Civil War finally ends in La. as Army of Trans-Miss. surrenders in New Orleans.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. A most appropriate photograph to share on Memorial Day, this one from the New Orleans Public Library captures soldiers from the various camps in Louisiana and Mississippi who came to New Orleans for brief periods of weekend leaves and are shown around the city by guides supplied by the WPA recreation division. Here the WPA guide is in Jackson Square with a group of military tourists on May 26, 1941.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    The Louisiana Corn Festival is held every year the second full weekend in June. The festival and slogan “Aw Shucks” originated in 1986 and still is the only corn festival in the state of Louisiana. The name Louisiana Corn Festival was given to honor the impact that agriculture has on our economy and a Corn Farmer is honored each year. This festival has something for all ages. There is music every night with live bands Friday and Saturday night with a street dance, games, contests, corn cooking contest, children's parade, pirogue races, corn shucking contest and corn eating contest! This year we will host our 2nd Annual Car, Truck, and Bike Show on Saturday, June 9th. So follow the rows of corn down to Bunkie, where you are sure to have a corn shucking good time!!
       Bunkie will celebrate the 32nd Annual Corn Festival on June 7, 8, & 9, 2018. Carnival Bracelets to ride all night on Thursday & Friday are $20, Saturday ALL DAY bracelets are $25 and individual ride tickets are available for purchase. Gate Entrance is $3 for 21 and up and $1 for 20 and below. Thursday’s Family night has no gate entrance fee. Our city wide parade will roll Saturday at 10am. Join our community this year and help us celebrate 32 years!
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. The Tip Jar Junkie plays on Royal St.
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Lamar White
Tip Jar Junkie
Soldiers on Leave in New Orleans

Thursday, May 17, 2018

261. Karen Celestan

261. We talk to Karen Celestan about her book, Freedom's Dance, which covers social aid and pleasure clubs, along with second line parades. In this book, the powerful images of noted photographer Eric Waters are paired with a collection of essays by cultural leaders to offer the first complete look at the Social, Aid and Pleasure Club (SAPC) parade culture in New Orleans. Ranging from ideological approaches to the contributions of musicians, development of specific rituals by various clubs, and parade accessories such as elaborately decorated fans and sashes, Freedom’s Dance provides an unparalleled photographic and textual overview of the SAPC Second Line, tracking its origins in African traditions and subsequent development in black New Orleans culture.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. May 19, 1862. Union Gen. Benjamin "Beast" Butler Order no. 28 published.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Jazz musician George Murphy "Pops" Foster (May 19, 1892 – October 29, 1969) played string bass, tuba and trumpet. Born on a plantation near McCall in Ascension Parish, his family moved to New Orleans when he was about ten years of age. His older brother, Willard Foster, began playing banjo and guitar; George started out on a cello then switched to string bass.  Foster was playing professionally by 1907 and worked with Jack Carey, Kid Ory, Armand Piron, King Oliver and other prominent hot bands of the era. In 1921 he moved to St. Louis.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Little Walter Music Festival
    May 24-25, 2018
    Red River Levee stage
    800.551.9546
    Honor Little Walter's legacy. The Little Walter Music Festival is a festival held at the Alexandria Amphitheater in Alexandria, La. honoring Rock & Roll Hall of Famer, Blues sideman and bandleader "Little Walter." For a complete list of entertainment visit the Little Walter Music Festival Facebook page. The event is free.
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. The Superband, made up of New Orleans muscians, plays to raise money for Hector Gallardo. He leads the group Hector Gallardo & his Cuban Jazz Trio. He brought his unique percussion sound from Cuba when he immigrated decades ago, and he has made a profound impact on the New Orleans music scene. 
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Thursday, May 10, 2018

260. Joseph Makkos, part 2.

260. Part 2 of our interview with Joseph Makkos. For years, Joseph salvaged letterpresses and boxes of rare type from local print shops. He was trawling through Craigslist one day in 2013 when he came upon an ad for a “historic newspaper collection.” Hours later, he had become the proud owner of a Times-Picayune archive from 1885 up to 1930, a collection carefully preserved in some 30,000 airtight tubes. Inspired by other print conservation efforts, Makkos launched New Orleans DNA to not only preserve his newspapers but also nurture an appreciation for their true pricelessness.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. May 12, 1898. New constitution includes the "Grandfather Clause" to permit illiterate whites to vote; a poll tax and literacy test included to disqualify black voters.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. World's Fair Opens. Saturday, May 12, 1984. Crowds flocked to see Seymour D. Fair, the Wonder Wall, the gondolas, the bare-breasted mermaids, synchronized swimmers, and much more (not to mention the food) on opening day, May 12, 1984. Themed "The World of Rivers—Fresh Waters as a Source of Life", the fair took place 100 years after the 1884 World Cotton Centennial (aka World's Fair) which occupied grounds we now know of as Audubon Park.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    26th Starks Mayhaw Festival
    May 17-19, 2018
       Our festival celebrates the best tasting jelly around. Be sure to stop by and buy some Mayhaw jelly. Our vendors also create numerous other berry jellies. Arts & Crafts, Live Entertainment, auction, Great Food, Jelly Contest, Live Auction, Car Show, Kids Games, Carnival Rides.
       Our festival is held each year on 13 acre site at the intersection of Hwy 109 & Hwy 12 in Starks, LA.
    105 Hwy 109 North
    Starks, LA 70661
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. The Taser Family Band plays on Royal St. They are available at 615.480.6037.
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Taser Family Band.

Friday, May 4, 2018

259. Joseph Makkos, part 1

259.  Part 1 of our interview with Joseph Makkos. For years, Joseph salvaged letterpresses and boxes of rare type from local print shops. He was trawling through Craigslist one day in 2013 when he came upon an ad for a “historic newspaper collection.” Hours later, he had become the proud owner of a Times-Picayune archive from 1885 up to 1930, a collection carefully preserved in some 30,000 airtight tubes. Inspired by other print conservation efforts, Makkos launched New Orleans DNA to not only preserve his newspapers but also nurture an appreciation for their true pricelessness.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. May 4, 1970. T.H. Williams wins Pulitzer Prize for his biography, Huey Long.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The Inner Harbor-Navigation Canal, commonly known to New Orleanians as the Industrial Canal, was formally opened on, May 5, 1923. 
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    44th Annual Cochon De Lait Festival
    Mansura, Louisiana
    May 10-13, 2018
       The Cochon de Lait Festival is held annually on the second full weekend in May in Mansura, Louisiana. Mansura is the Cochon de Lait capital of the world. The festival mixes great Cajun food, good times and Louisiana music with the famous cochon de lait (French for roast suckling pig). There is plenty to see and do for the entire family to “pass a good time.”
       From the Children's Pig Pen to the Greasy Pig contest and the Cracklin Cook-off in between, we have something for you. Please join us in Mansura to celebrate this wonderful testament to the "cochon!"
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. The Superband, made up of New Orleans muscians, plays to raise money for Hector Gallardo. He leads the group Hector Gallardo & his Cuban Jazz Trio. He brought his unique percussion sound from Cuba when he immigrated decades ago, and he has made a profound impact on the New Orleans music scene.
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Friday, April 27, 2018

258. Charles Lane. The Colfax Massacre.

258. We interview Washington Post journalist Charles Lane, who wrote a book on the Colfax Massacre entitled The Day Freedom Died: The Colfax Massacre and the Betrayal of Reconstruction. Here is the epic tale of the Colfax Massacre, the mass murder of more than sixty black men on Easter Sunday 1873 that propelled a small Louisiana town into the center of the nation’s consciousness.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 28, 1761. Gov. Jacques Pilippe, born in Jefferson Parish.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. On Saturday, April 30, 1803, the Louisiana Purchase Treaty was signed by Robert Livingston, James Monroe, and Barbé Marbois in Paris. Jefferson announced the treaty to the American people on July 4. After the signing of the Louisiana Purchase agreement in 1803, Livingston made this famous statement, "We have lived long, but this is the noblest work of our whole lives...From this day the United States take their place among the powers of the first rank."
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Ahoy! It's the
    The Louisiana Pirate Festival
    May 3-13, 2018
    Experience our unique pirate and seafaring festival with events on both land and sea, including watercraft exhibitions and a fireworks display over the lake.
       On the shores of historic Lake Charles, the Louisiana Pirate Festival showcases entertainment by a variety of talented musicians, performers and artists.  Plus, this year’s festival also includes the inaugural Louisiana Pirate Festival Costume Ball and the first-ever Louisiana Pirate Festival Parade Extravaganza!
       Join us for a family-friendly event with cannon demonstrations, costume contests, local arts and crafts, themed souvenirs, a boat parade, a Little Matey Children’s Area with Captain Crabbe, a petting zoo and inflatables, daily Buccaneer parades on site, pirogue building and rain gutter pirate ship races, games and attractions, including the acclaimed Todd Armstrong Carnival, a Barbecue Competitors Alliance Cajun Pirate BBQ Cook-Off and more. And don't miss our Culinary Coffer where you'll discover a treasure of great Pirate-pleasing foods. Shiver me timbers, we’re going to have some fun!
  4. Postcards from the Resistance. We talk to Alex Bozeman, who spoke at this week's Earth Day Rally in Ruston, LA.
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Alex Bozeman

Thursday, April 19, 2018

257. Mark Bologna, part 2

257. Part 2 of our conversation with Mark Bologna, host of the Beyond Bourbon Street podcast. We were excited to find another podcast with a similar focus to ours. "My name is Mark Bologna and I’ll be your guide on this journey. I was born and raised in New Orleans, and specifically in Gentilly, a neighborhood just down the road from Lake Pontchartrain in the heart of the city. I love my hometown and can’t wait to share it with you!" Mark would like to hear from you and help you plan your trip to the Big Easy. Find out more here.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 21, 1804. Gov. Laussat, last French Gov., leaves Louisiana.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. According to the Amistad Research Center, The Reverse Freedom Rides of 1962 were a deliberate parody of the Freedom Rides organized by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) in the previous year. Also called the Freedom Rides North, African American "participants" in the Reverse Freedom Rides were offered free one-way transportation and the promise of free housing and guaranteed employment to Northern cities. George Singelmann of the Greater New Orleans Citizens' Council orchestrated the Reverse Freedom Rides, which served as the Citizens' Councils' means of testing the sincerity of Northern liberals' quest for equality for African Americans. This attempt to embarrass Northern critics of the Citizens' Councils was a way of, in Singelmann's words, "telling the North to put up or shut up." Public outcry against the Reverse Freedom Rides was swift and direct, with groups such as the Urban League of Greater New Orleans leading the chorus of disapproval. WDSU Radio released a statement in April 1962, that typifies the response: "WDSU believes the Freedom Bus North movement is sick sensationalism bordering on moronic."
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Jazz Fest 2018!
    April 27-May 6, 2018
    The 48th New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.
    New Orleans Fair Grounds
    1751 Gentilly Boulevard
    New Orleans, LA
    This is the #1 music festival in New Orleans, with over a week's worth of world-class entertainment. This year's entertainment includes Sting, Sturgill Simpson, Steel Pulse, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, Ron Carter Trio, The Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Jon Cleary, Samantha Fish, Davell Crawford, Jake Shimabukuro, Wayne Toups, Luther Kent & Trickbag, Bobby Rush, Leslie Odom Jr., Eric Lindell, Sidi Toure of Mali, BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet, Big Chief Donald Harrison, Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah, Chubby Carrier & the Bayou Swamp Band, and many more.
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Boston Becca plays violin on Royal St.
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Friday, April 13, 2018

256. Mark Bologna, part 1

256 Part 1 of our interview of Mark Bologna, host of the Beyond Bourbon Street podcast. We were excited to find another podcast with a similar focus to ours. "My name is Mark Bologna and I’ll be your guide on this journey. I was born and raised in New Orleans, and specifically in Gentilly, a neighborhood just down the road from Lake Pontchartrain in the heart of the city. I love my hometown and can’t wait to share it with you!" Mark would like to hear from you and help you plan your trip to the Big Easy. Find out more here.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April 15, 1795. The Pointe Coupee Slave Rebellion.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. April 16, 1718. Official date of founding of New Orleans.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Bayou Teche Black Bear Festival
    Friday, April 20th and Saturday, April 21st 2018
    Along the Bank of the Bayou Teche
    Downtown Historic Franklin, Louisiana
    We invite you to the Fifteenth Annual Bayou Teche Black Bear Festival, April 20th and 21st 2018 in beautiful downtown Franklin. Franklin, located in the heart of St. Mary Parish along the banks of the Bayou Teche, is noted for its beautiful antebellum homes, quaint bed and breakfasts, and majestic live oaks. The city is surrounded by expansive cypress tupelo swamps, the unique and expansive Atchafalaya Basin. The area has a rich natural heritage, with a bountiful list of species readily available for the wildlife fancier. Among those is the Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus ). Please browse our website for information about the festival including the activities, live music, black bear education and all of the other events to be held and please remember to tell your friends!
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Stretch Adams sings and plays the banjo in the Vieux Carre. 
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Friday, April 6, 2018

255. Pamela Tyler, part 2

255. Part 2 of our interview with Pamela Tyler about women's suffrage in Louisiana. In Silk Stockings & Ballot Boxes, Pamela Tyler examines the activities of organized upper- and middle-class women in New Orleans in the twentieth century, with an emphasis on their behavior in the political arena. Tyler traces the path of women's political activities, from their indirect political influence and women's clubs, to their direct integration into the larger political process. In her narrative, she examines the post-suffrage alternatives that southern women faced in their quest for inclusion in the political arena.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. April, 7 1682. LaSalle and Tonti reached mouth of Miss. River.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Major League Baseball pitcher Edward Francis Lafitte was born at 319 Bourbon Street on April 7, 1886.   He played for the Detroit Tigers (1909–12), the Brooklyn Tip-Tops (1914–15), and the Buffalo Blues (1915).  His college days were spent pitching for the Georgia Techbaseball team (1906 and 1907) and as a starter in the first intercollegiate basketball game played by Georgia Tech. He died on April 12, 1971 at the age of 85.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    35th Louisiana Railroad Days Festival
    DeQuincy Railroad Museum Park
    400 Lake Charles Avenue
    DeQuincy LA, 70633
    April 12-14, 2018
    Bands:
    Collin Raye, Southwest Jazz, Rosedown Rockers, Rusty Metoyer and the Zydeko Krush, Gyth Rigdon, and Collin Raye.
    All entertainment is free!!
    Enjoy the day with great music and family fun!
    Full Schedule
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Buku Broux plays the Kora in Jackson Square.
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Thursday, March 29, 2018

254. Pamela Tyler, part 1

254. Women's History Month. Part 1 of our interview with Pamela Tyler about women's suffrage in Louisiana. In Silk Stockings & Ballot Boxes, Pamela Tyler examines the activities of organized upper- and middle-class women in New Orleans in the twentieth century, with an emphasis on their behavior in the political arena. Tyler traces the path of women's political activities, from their indirect political influence and women's clubs, to their direct integration into the larger political process. In her narrative, she examines the post-suffrage alternatives that southern women faced in their quest for inclusion in the political arena.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. March 30, 1870. 15th amendment gave Blacks the right to vote.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Rosa Freeman was born March 31, 1911, to Alfred Bird “A.B.” Freeman and Ella West. Coca Cola heiress and racial pioneer Rosa Freeman Keller worked tirelessly throughout her long life for those less fortunate than herself, particularly New Orleans’s African American residents. Though her elite social background made her perhaps an unlikely social activist, Keller helped lead the fight for the integration of public schools and transportation facilities in New Orleans.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Lao New Year Celebration
    March 24th, 2016 - April 1st, 2018
    Lanexang Village
    7913 Champa Ave,
    Broussard, LA 70518
    337-364-3403
    Website
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Joe Shedlo plays guitar on Royal St.
  5. Postcard from Louisiana, part 2. Michelle Erenberg and Robin Barber from Lift Louisiana invite people to attend a Advocacy Day in Baton Rouge on April 11 to demand equality for women. 
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Thursday, March 22, 2018

253. Melanie Oubre, part 2

253. Women's History. Part 2 of our interview with Melanie Oubre. Emerge Louisiana recruits and trains women to run for office. Emerge Louisiana launched in 2017 as the premier campaign-training program for Democratic women in the state. Emerge inspires women to run for public office, and hones their skills to win. Our goal is clear: to increase the number of Democratic women in all levels of public office throughout the state. Emerge Louisiana is one of 23 other state affiliates that are part of the national organization, Emerge America.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. March 25, 1793. Pope Pius VI established the Diocese of Louisiana.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. Broad Street Overpass. March 24, 1953.  "New Orleans traffic, once blocked by obsolete old canal and numerous railroad tracks, now moves smoothly over S. Broad Overpass in center of city. This is one of 11 grade separation structures completed to date in New Orleans' integrated Union Passenger Terminal and grade separation program. Other projects are now now under construction."
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Pyrate Week
    March 30-April 8, 2018
    From the last weekend of March through the first weekend of April every year, the citizens of New Orleans celebrate NOLA Pyrate Week - 10 days of swashbuckling, art, music, food, events and general camaraderie among the Pyrates of Louisiana - past & present - and their mates from around the globe!
    Click here for the full schedule. Arrrrrrrrrrrrrrh!
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Aislinn Kerchaert writes some Mystical Poetry for the Louisiana Anthology. You can find her on Royal St. in New Orleans.
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Friday, March 16, 2018

252. Melanie Oubre, part 1

252. Women's History Month. Part one of our interview with Melanie Oubre, who works with Emerge, Louisiana. Emerge Louisiana recruits and trains women to run for office. Emerge Louisiana launched in 2017 as the premier campaign-training program for Democratic women in the state. Emerge inspires women to run for public office, and hones their skills to win. Our goal is clear: to increase the number of Democratic women in all levels of public office throughout the state. Emerge Louisiana is one of 23 other state affiliates that are part of the national organization, Emerge America.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. March 17, 1791. Baron de Carondelet de Noyelles is appointed governor-general of Louisiana.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. According to Buddy Stall, on March 17, 1930, the first "coffee break" in the United States occured when the "managers of the Delta Steamship Company, then the Mississippi Steamship Company, summoned their 80 employees in the Hibernia Bank building and initiated a daily 3:30 p.m. coffee recess. Company scouts had found the custom to be very well-received in Brazil and adopted the idea for its New Orleans office. The tradition started by the shipping company spread like wildfire, and in a short time completely saturated the entire metropolitan area, which only goes to prove good news travels fast."
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Louisiana Crawfish Festival
    March 22 – 25, 2018 
    St. Bernard Parish Government Complex site
    Frederick J. Sigur Civic Center
    8200 West Judge Perez Dr.,
    Chalmette, Louisiana
    The Louisiana Crawfish Festival is located in Beautiful and Historical St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana which is rich with heritage, moss covered oak trees, creole tomatoes, Louisiana Bayous, shrimp boats, oyster luggers, oil refineries, and is a fisherman’s haven. St. Bernard Parish is the home of the Battle of New Orleans site over-looking the mighty Mississippi River
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Bruce meets the Tip Jar Junkies on Royal St. 
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Thursday, March 8, 2018

251. Michelle Erenberg. Lift, LA

251. Women's History Month. Our interview with Michelle Erenberg. Michelle cofounded Lift Louisiana to advocate for reproductive rights. She has worked as a policy advocate, community organizer, and coalition coordinator for more than a decade. Her past work experience includes community organizing for Planned Parenthood in New Orleans, coordinating a diverse coalition of environmental, community and faith-based organizations across the Gulf Coast in response to the 2010 BP oil spill, and analyzing and educating the public about policies and public engagement opportunities related to ecological and community recovery and restoration. Since 2009, she has served on the board of the National Council of Jewish Women Greater New Orleans Section as NCJW’s Louisiana Policy Advocate, a nationally appointed position, as well as Vice President of Public Affairs and Education. Erenberg has a B.A. in Psychology from Loyola University New Orleans and an MPA in Nonprofit Management from the University of New Orleans.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. March 10, 1864. Union Gen. Nathaniel Banks begins in Red River Campaign.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The New Orleans Lyceum and Library Society had its origins in the 1844 ordinance passed by the Second Municipality Council. The library opened on March 10, 1846 with 3,400 books in its collection; by 1858 it held over 10,000 volumes. Originally located in temporary quarters, the Lyceum Library moved into the new municipality hall (now Gallier Hall) when its rooms in that building were ready for occupancy.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Steel Magnolias
    Saturday, March 10
    Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts
    325 Minor St.
    Kenner, LA 70062
    504.461.9475
    Website
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Bruce listens to a high school brass band in Jackson Square.
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Friday, March 2, 2018

250. Lisa Walker and Reilly Sullivan, part 2

250. Women's History Month. Part 2 of our interview with Lisa Walker and Reilly Sullivan, who join us to talk about Alice Dunbar Nelson. Poet, essayist, diarist, and activist Alice Moore Dunbar-Nelson was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, to mixed-race parents. Her African American, Anglo, Native American, and Creole heritage contributed to her complex understandings of gender, race, and ethnicity, subjects she often addressed in her work. Her first book, Violets and Other Tales (1895), was published when she was just 20. A writer of short stories, essays, and poems, Dunbar-Nelson was comfortable in many genres but was best known for her prose. One of the few female African American diarists of the early 20th century, she portrays the complicated reality of African American women and intellectuals, addressing topics such as racism, oppression, family, work, and sexuality.  
  1. This week in Louisiana history. February 3, 1820. Slavery outlawed within the Louisiana Purchase territory north of 36°30' latitude.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The Washington Post printed on March 3, 1909, "The news comes from Louisiana that large areas of that State heretofore devoted to the growing of cotton will be planted to cane, because the boll weevil has wrought such havoc on the former crop. If this pest shall be the occasion of a diversity of farm crops at the South his presence in the cotton field will not prove an unmixed evil."
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    New Orleans Bourbon Festival
    March 8th, 2018 - March 10th, 2018
    Contemporary Arts Center
    900 Camp St.,
    New Orleans, LA 70130
    504-525-9444
    Website
    Laissez les bon temps rouler. Let the good times roll. The motto of a city that knows how to host a party. Now couple that with a historic relationship to Bourbon, world-renowned food, music and culture. The result – the SECOND annual New OrleansBourbon Festival – March 8, 9, and 10, 2018!
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Bruce listens to the Big Dixie Swingers on Frenchman Street in New Orleans.
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Friday, February 23, 2018

249. Lisa Walker and Reilly Sullivan, Part 1

249. Black History Month. Part 1 of our interview with Lisa Walker and Reilly Sullivan, who join us to talk about Alice Dunbar Nelson. Poet, essayist, diarist, and activist Alice Moore Dunbar-Nelson was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, to mixed-race parents. Her African American, Anglo, Native American, and Creole heritage contributed to her complex understandings of gender, race, and ethnicity, subjects she often addressed in her work. Her first book, Violets and Other Tales (1895), was published when she was just 20. A writer of short stories, essays, and poems, Dunbar-Nelson was comfortable in many genres but was best known for her prose. One of the few female African American diarists of the early 20th century, she portrays the complicated reality of African American women and intellectuals, addressing topics such as racism, oppression, family, work, and sexuality.  
  1. This week in Louisiana history. February 24, 1843. Bossier Parish created out of Natchitoches District, named for Pierre E. Bossier.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. February 24, 1857. The First Mardi Graw Krewe Parade: the Mystic Krewe of Comus. Comus, the god of revelry, became the first New Orleans Mardi Gras parade with a theme, floats bearing masked riders, parade route and a list of members who participated, on Feb. 24, 1857. The parade came about in a sense because of misfortune, or, better yet, misconduct.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Soul Fest is one of New Orleans biggest celebrations of African American history.
    March 3rd, 2018 - March 4th, 2018
    Audubon Zoo
    6500 Magazine St.,
    New Orleans, LA 70118
    800-774-7394
    Website
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Bruce meets the Gospel Soul Singers in the French Quarter.
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Thursday, February 15, 2018

248. Jeremy Simien, part 2

248. Black History Month. Part 2 of our interview with Jeremy Simien. Jeremy studies the history of Louisiana's Free People of Color. He has also gathered a large collection of their personal possessions, especially pictures and portraits. Les gens de couleur libres were people of variant degrees of African descent who were either born free, liberated, or purchased their own freedom during the antebellum period. In their height, these people of African descent accounted for 1/5th of the population of New Orleans, owned 13 of the property in the Vieux Carré or “French Quarter” and had an 80% literacy rate. This important group consisted of planters, skilled tradesman, inventors and real-estate developers/speculators.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. February 17, 1801. Thomas Jefferson elected 3rd president after tying Aaron Burr and winning the tie-breaking votes in the House of Representatives.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The New Orleans 1885 Mardi Gras [February 17] was extraordinary. On the streets were large numbers of international visitors connected with the [World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial] Exposition, several Central American Indian groups, and some fifty to sixty Plains Indians from the [Buffalo Bill] Wild West Show, including four chiefs, all of whom were likely on the street in native dress. For [locals of African descent, particularly groups who took to masking as Indians,] Mardi Gras translated nicely into a freedom celebration, a day to commemorate their own history and spirit, to be arrogant, to circumvent the hostile authorities, to overturn the established order, and now and then to seek revenge." From Mardi Gras Indians (Pelican Publishing Company, 1994), by 'Michael P. Smith.
  3. This week in Louisiana.
    Prospect 4 Exhibition "The Batture" by Jeff Whetstone
    February 17-25, 2018
    UNO St. Claude Gallery
    2429 St. Claude Ave.
    New Orleans, LA 70117
    Phone: 504.280.6493
    Website
    The UNO St. Claude Gallery is hosting "The Batture," an exhibit by photographer Jeff Whetstone that explores the economies and ecologies that exist along the banks of the Mississippi River near New Orleans. “The batture is the land the river owns. It is a thin strip of weeds, trees and mud between the edge of the Mississippi River and the tall, hardened levees that contain its floods,” said Whetstone. “The batture is ephemeral. It disappears with the river is high and reemerges when the tide falls, swept and changed. It is a cyclical land, untied to human time and unclaimed; a temporary alluvial wilderness.”
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Bruce listens to the Big Dixie Swingers on Frenchman Street in New Orleans.
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Thursday, February 8, 2018

247. Jeremy K. Simien, part 1

247. Black History Month. Part 1 of our interview with Jeremy Simien. Jeremy studies the history of Louisiana's Free People of Color. He has also gathered a large collection of their personal possessions, especially pictures and portraits. Les gens de couleur libres were people of variant degrees of African descent who were either born free, liberated, or purchased their own freedom during the antebellum period. In their height, these people of African descent accounted for 1/5th of the population of New Orleans, owned 13 of the property in the Vieux Carré or “French Quarter” and had an 80% literacy rate. This important group consisted of planters, skilled tradesman, inventors and real-estate developers/speculators.
  1. This week in Louisiana history. February 10, 1763. The Treaty of Paris gave Louisiana Colony to Spain.
  2. This week in New Orleans history. The port of New Orleans and the Louisiana Territory west of the Mississippi were ceded to Spain on February 10, 1763, by Article 7 of the Treaty of Paris.
  3. This week in Louisiana. Mardi Gras, Fat Tuesday, will next be celebrated in Louisiana on Tuesday, February 13, 2018. Included here is a list of highlights of the extensive Mardi Gras carnival season scheduled in Louisiana during 2018, focusing on long-running Krewes and those with widespread appeal. Laissez le bon temps rouler!
  4. Postcards from Louisiana. Bruce listens to the brass band Baby David and the Freeloaders in the Buckshot Bourbon St. Drinkery.
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